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Effect of rumen-protected supplements of fish oil on intake, digestibility and nitrogen balance of growing goats

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 August 2016

J. R. Fernández
Affiliation:
Estación Experimental del Zaidín, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Unidad de Nutrición Animal, Profesor Albareda, 1,18008 Granada, Spain
M. Rodríguez Osorio
Affiliation:
Estación Experimental del Zaidín, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Unidad de Nutrición Animal, Profesor Albareda, 1,18008 Granada, Spain
E. Ramos
Affiliation:
Estación Experimental del Zaidín, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Unidad de Nutrición Animal, Profesor Albareda, 1,18008 Granada, Spain
G. de la Torre
Affiliation:
Estación Experimental del Zaidín, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Unidad de Nutrición Animal, Profesor Albareda, 1,18008 Granada, Spain
F. Gil Extremera
Affiliation:
Estación Experimental del Zaidín, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Unidad de Nutrición Animal, Profesor Albareda, 1,18008 Granada, Spain
M. R. Sanz Sampelayo
Affiliation:
Estación Experimental del Zaidín, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Unidad de Nutrición Animal, Profesor Albareda, 1,18008 Granada, Spain
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Abstract

Two groups of six male goats were used to assess the effects of rumen-protected supplements offish oil on intake, digestibility and nitrogen (N) balance. The animals were offered a diet consisting of forage and concentrate, the latter fraction supplemented with 0 (control) or lOOg/kg of rumen-protected fish oil supplement (PFO), containing a high proportion of the n-3 series (whole diet contained 0 or 60 g PFO per kg dry matter). No significant differences (P > 0.05) were found between the two groups concerning live-weight gain, food intake, digestibility of DM, organic matter, N, neutral-detergent fibre and energy. In contrast, there were differences (P < 0.05) regarding the digestibility of fat and of acid-detergent fibre, which were higher among the animals given the PFO diet. With respect to the individual fatty acids, we observed higher digestibility (P < 0.05) of C14:0, C16:0, C18:0 and C20:0 among the animals given the PFO diet. The digestibility of C14:0, C18:0 and C20:0 was found to be negative among the animals given the control diet. No significant differences (P > 0-05) were found regarding digestibility of total C18:1. In contrast, the coefficients for C18:2 (n-6) and C18:3 (n-3) were higher (P < 0.05) among the non-supplemented animals. The intake and faecal flow values of C18:0 suggest that the mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids with 18 atoms of carbon may, in both cases, undergo partial hydrogenation, which would be greater among the control group. The utilization of C20:5 (n-3) and, especially, of C22 : 6 (n-3), which were consumed only by the animals given the PFO diet, was estimated at 1-000. The PFO diet also produced lower levels ofurinary-N excretion (P < 0.05), giving rise to higher N balances (P < 0.05).

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © British Society of Animal Science 2004

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