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Results of the BRD CAP project: progress toward identifying genetic markers associated with BRD susceptibility

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 November 2014

Alison Van Eenennaam*
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, University of California, Davis, California, USA
Holly Neibergs
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington, USA
Christopher Seabury
Affiliation:
Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A & M University, College Station, Texas, USA
Jeremy Taylor
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Sciences, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri, USA
Zeping Wang
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington, USA
Erik Scraggs
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington, USA
Robert D. Schnabel
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Sciences, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri, USA
Jared Decker
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Sciences, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri, USA
Andrzej Wojtowicz
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington, USA
Sharif Aly
Affiliation:
Veterinary Medicine Teaching and Research Center, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, Tulare, California, USA Department of Population Health and Reproduction, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, California, USA
Jessica Davis
Affiliation:
Veterinary Medicine Teaching and Research Center, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, Tulare, California, USA
Patricia Blanchard
Affiliation:
California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, California, USA
Beate Crossley
Affiliation:
California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, California, USA
Paul Rossitto
Affiliation:
Veterinary Medicine Teaching and Research Center, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, Tulare, California, USA
Terry Lehenbauer
Affiliation:
Veterinary Medicine Teaching and Research Center, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, Tulare, California, USA Department of Population Health and Reproduction, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, California, USA
Robert Hagevoort
Affiliation:
Agricultural Science Center, New Mexico State University, Clovis, New Mexico, USA
Erik Chavez
Affiliation:
Agricultural Science Center, New Mexico State University, Clovis, New Mexico, USA
J. Shannon Neibergs
Affiliation:
School of Economic Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington, USA
James E. Womack
Affiliation:
Department of Molecular and Cellular Medicine, Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine, Texas A&M University, Bryan, Texas, USA
*
*Corresponding author. E-mail: alvaneenennaam@ucdavis.edu

Abstract

The Bovine Respiratory Disease Coordinated Agricultural Project (BRD CAP) is a 5-year project funded by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), with an overriding objective to use the tools of modern genomics to identify cattle that are less susceptible to BRD. To do this, two large genome wide association studies (GWAS) were conducted using a case:control design on preweaned Holstein dairy heifers and beef feedlot cattle. A health scoring system was used to identify BRD cases and controls. Heritability estimates for BRD susceptibility ranged from 19 to 21% in dairy calves to 29.2% in beef cattle when using numerical scores as a semi-quantitative definition of BRD. A GWAS analysis conducted on the dairy calf data showed that single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) effects explained 20% of the variation in BRD incidence and 17–20% of the variation in clinical signs. These results represent a preliminary analysis of ongoing work to identify loci associated with BRD. Future work includes validation of the chromosomal regions and SNPs that have been identified as important for BRD susceptibility, fine mapping of chromosomes to identify causal SNPs, and integration of predictive markers for BRD susceptibility into genetic tests and national cattle genetic evaluations.

Type
Review Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2014 

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References

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