Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-cf9d5c678-ljdsm Total loading time: 0.579 Render date: 2021-07-30T19:16:08.412Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

The Political Economy of Military Spending in Israel

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 August 2014

Alex Mintz
Affiliation:
Texas A&M University
Michael D. Ward
Affiliation:
University of Colorado

Abstract

Prior scholarly analysis of Israeli military spending has focused on national security questions. We present a mathematical model incorporating security threats as well as electoral cycles and corporate profits. The parameters are estimated empirically. The results support the idea that in Israel the military budget at the margins is also employed as a political-economic instrument to help manage the economy and to provide a favorable election climate for incumbents. It is suggested that the politicaleconomic dynamic widely attributed to Western industrialized societies may be of increasing importance in other societies throughout the world.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © American Political Science Association 1989

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Allan, Pierre. 1983. Crisis Bargaining and the Arms Race: A Theoretical Model. Cambridge, MA: Ballinger.Google Scholar
Anderson, Theodore W. 1958. An Introduction to Multivariate Statistics. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
Bard, Mitchell. 1988. “The Influence of Ethnic Interest Groups on American Middle East Policy.” In The Domestic Sources of American Foreign Policy, ed. Kegley, Charles W. Jr., and Wittkopf, Eugene. New York: St. Martin's.Google Scholar
Berglas, Eitan. 1983. “Defense and the Economy: The Israeli Experience.” Working Paper. Maurice Falk Institute for Economic Research in Israel, Jerusalem.Google Scholar
Bichler, Shimshon. 1986. “The Political Economy of Defense.” Master's thesis. Hebrew University.Google Scholar
Bishop, W. J., and Sorenson, David S.. 1982. “Superpower Defense Expenditures and Foreign Policy.” In Foreign Policy USA/USSR, ed. Kegley, Charles W. Jr., and McGowan, Patrick. Beverly Hills: Sage.Google Scholar
Brzoska, Michael, and Ohlson, Thomas, eds. 1986. Arms Production in the Third World. London: Taylor & Francis.Google Scholar
Chatterji, Manas. 1969. “A Model of Resolution of Conflict between India and Pakistan.” Peace Research Society (International) Papers 12:87102.Google Scholar
Congressional Quarterly. 1986. The Middle East. 6th ed. Washington: Congressional Quarterly.Google Scholar
Domke, William K., Eichenberg, Richard C., and Kelleher, Catherine M.. 1983. “The Illusion of Choice: Defense and Welfare in Advanced Industrial Democracies, 1948–1978.” American Political Science Review 77:1935.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Eichenberg, Richard C. 1984. “The Expenditure and Revenue Effects of Defense Spending in the Federal Republic of Germany.” Policy Sciences 16:391411.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fischer, Gregory W., and Crecine, John Patrick. 1979. “Defense Budgets, Fiscal Policy, Domestic Spending, and Arms Races.” Presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Chicago.Google Scholar
Gallant, Ronald A. 1987. Nonlinear Statistical Models. New York: John Wiley & Sons.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gandolfo, Giancarlo. 1981. Qualitative Analysis and Econometric Estimation of Continuous Time Dynamic Models. Amsterdam: North-Holland.Google Scholar
Griffin, Larry J., Devine, Joel, and Wallace, Michael. 1982. “Monopoly Capital, Organized Labor, and Military Expenditures: Military Keynesianism in the United States, 1949–1976.” American Journal of Sociology (Supplement) 88:S113–S153.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Heller, Mark, Tamari, Dov, and Eytan, Zeev. 1983. The Middle East Military Balance. Tel Aviv: Jaffee Center for Strategic Studies.Google Scholar
Hollist, William Ladd. 1977. “Alternative Explanations of Competitive Arms Processes: Tests on Four Pairs of Nations.” American Journal of Political Science 21:313–40.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Israeli Defense Forces. 1982. The IDF in Its Might. Tel Aviv: Revivim.Google Scholar
Katz, James E., ed. 1984. Arms Production in Developing Countries. Lexington, MA: Lexington Books.Google Scholar
Klare, Michael T. 1983. “The Unnoticed Arms Trade: Exports of Conventional Arms-making Technology.” International Security 8:6890.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lambelet, Jean-Christian, Luterbacher, Urs, and Allan, Pierre. 1979. “Dynamics of Arms Races: Mutual Stimulation versus Self-Stimulation.” Journal of Peace Science 4:4966.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lissak, Moshe. 1983. “Paradoxes of Israeli Civilmilitary Relations: An Introduction. Journal of Strategic Studies 6:112.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Luterbacher, Urs, and Allan, Pierre. 1982. “Modeling Politico-economic Interactions within and between Nations.” International Political Science Review 3:404–33.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Luttwak, Edward N. 1984. “Defense Planning in Israel: A Brief Retrospective.” In Defense Planning in Less-Industrialized States, ed. Neuman, Stephanie G.. Lexington, MA: Lexington Books.Google Scholar
McGuire, Martin C. 1982. “U.S. Assistance, Israeli Allocation, and the Arms Race in the Middle East.” Journal of Conflict Resolution 26:199235.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mintz, Alex. 1986. “Arms Imports As an Action-Reaction Process: An Empirical Test of Six Pairs of Developing Nations.” International Interactions 12:229–43.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mintz, Alex. 1988. “Electoral Cycles and Military Spending: A Comparison of Israel and the United States.” Comparative Political Studies 21:368–81.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mintz, Alex, and Hicks, Alex M.. 1984. “Military Keynesianism in the United States, 1949–1976: Disaggregating Military Expenditures and Their Determination.” American Journal of Sociology 90:411–17.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Neuman, Stephanie G. 1984. “International Stratification and Third World Military Industries.” International Organization 38:167–97.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nincic, Miroslav. 1982. The Political Economy of U.S. Military Spending. New York: Praeger.Google Scholar
Nincic, Miroslav, and Cusack, Thomas R.. 1979. “The Political Economy of U.S. Military Spending.” Journal of Peace Research 16:101–15.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ostrom, Charles. 1977. “Evaluating Alternative Foreign Policy Models: An Empirical Test between an Arms Race Model and an Organizational Politics Model.” Journal of Conflict Resolution 21:235–66.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Peri, Yoram. 1983. Between Battles and Ballots: Israeli Military in Politics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Pierre, Andrew J. 19811982. “Arms Sales: The New Diplomacy.” Foreign Affairs 60:266–86.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Quandt, William B. 1988. “The Electoral Cycle and the Conduct of American Foreign Policy.” In The Domestic Sources of American Foreign Policy, ed. Kegley, Charles W. Jr., New York: St Martin's.Google Scholar
Russett, Bruce M., and DeLuca, Donald R.. 1981. “Don't Tread on Me: Public Opinion and Foreign Policy in the Eighties.” Political Science Quarterly 96:381400.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Steinberg, Gerald M., and Hadar, Shmuel. 1988. Tactics without Strategy: The Role of State Subsidies in the Development of Technology-intensive Industries. Research report to the Jerusalem Institute for Research on Israel, Jerusalem.Google Scholar
Stockholm International Peace Research Institute. 1987. World Armaments and Disarmaments, SIPRI Yearbook 1986. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency. 1984. World Military Expenditures and Arms Transfers: 1972–1982. Washington: ACDA.Google Scholar
Ward, Michael D. 1984. “Differential Paths to Parity: A Study of the Contemporary Arms Race.” American Political Science Review 78:297317.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ward, Michael D., and Mahajan, Anil K.. 1985. “A Simulation Study of Indian Defense Expenditures.” Simulation and Games 16:371–98.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ward, Michael D., and Mintz, Alex. 1987. “Dynamics of Military Spending in Israel.” Journal of Conflict Resolution 31:86105.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wymer, Clifford R. 1972. “Econometric Estimation of Stochastic Differential Equation Systems.” Econometrica 40:565–77.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zussman, Pinchas. 1983. “Why Is Israel's Defense Burden So Heavy?” In Is It Indeed Hard To Be an Israeli? ed. Hareven, A.. Jerusalem: Van Leer Institute.Google Scholar
27
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The Political Economy of Military Spending in Israel
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

The Political Economy of Military Spending in Israel
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

The Political Economy of Military Spending in Israel
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *