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Revisiting the USDA reports: Context, capital and organization

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 October 2009

Cornelia Butler Flora
Affiliation:
Professor, Department of Sociology, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061.
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Extract

Much of what has been said regarding the two USDA reports relates to social organization: How do we organize science? How is indigenous knowledge organized? How is our food system organized? Social organization implies we have choices: at the individual level, the household level, the community level, the regional level, and the national level. It also means we must be aware of the global context in which our actions occur. Social organization is context-specific; one size does not fit all.

Type
Papers from the 10th Annual Conference of the Wallace Institute, “Alternative Agriculture Policy: A New Time to Choose,” Washington, D.C., March 1,1993
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1993

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References

1.Barlett, P.F. 1993. American Dreams, Rural Realities: Family Farms in Crisis. Univ. of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill.Google Scholar
2.Esteva, G. 1983. The Struggle for Rural Mexico. Bergin & Garvey, Publishers, Inc., South Hadley, Massachusetts.Google Scholar
3.Kloppenburg, J. Jr., 1991. Social theory and the de/reconstruction of agricultural science: Local knowledge for an alternative agriculture. Rural Sociology 56:519548.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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