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Comparison of alternative farming systems. III. Soil aggregate stability

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 October 2009

J.L. Jordahl
Affiliation:
District Conservationist, USDA-SCS, 100 8th Street South, Humboldt, IA 50548.
D.L. Karlen
Affiliation:
Soil Scientist, USDA-ARS, National Soil Tilth Laboratory, 2150 Pammel Drive, Ames, IA 50011.
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Abstract

Quantitative studies are needed to separate the real and supposed benefits of alternative farming practices. Our objective was to learn how conventional and alternative practices on adjacent farms in central Iowa affected the water stability of soil aggregates. We collected samples of Clarion loam (fine-loamy, mixed, mesic Typic Hapludoll) from adjacent 16 ha fields in fall 1990 and spring 1991. Aggregate stability was determined by wet-sieving and by measuring turbidity of soil-water suspensions. The combined effects of alternative practices resulted in greater water stability of soil aggregates, higher soil organic matter content, and lower bulk density compared with conventional practices. The components of the alternative system that were mainly responsible for these differences were: rotations that included oat and hay crops; ridge-tillage; and additions of 45 Mg/ha of a mixture of animal manure and municipal sludge during the first 3 years of each 5 year rotation. The more favorable soil physical conditions, shown by increased water stability of soil aggregates, presumably will improve soil water regimes and reduce long-term soil erosion losses from the alternatively managed fields.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1993

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