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The Evolution of a Caddo Community in Northeastern Texas: The Oak Hill Village Site (41RK214), Rusk County, Texas

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Timothy K. Perttula
Affiliation:
Archeological & Environmental Consultants, LLC, 10101 Woodhaven Dr., Austin, Texas 78753 (tkp4747@aol.com)
Robert Rogers
Affiliation:
PBS&J, 6504 Bridge Point Parkway, Suite 200, Austin, Texas 78730 (rmrogers@pbsj.com)
Corresponding

Abstract

The Oak Hill Village (41RK214) in northeastern Texas is a prehistoric (ca. A.D. 1150–1450) Caddo settlement that was completely excavated in the mid-1990s prior to lignite mining activities. Analysis of the architectural remains, key calibrated radiocarbon dates, and changes in ceramic decorations, indicates that the village evolved as three temporally and spatially different communities composed of a number of separate households. Emerging in the latter two communities were important social institutions (a plaza, an earthen mound, and specialized structures with extended entranceways) that bound this singular Caddo community together for approximately 150–200 years (ca. A.D. 1250–1450).

Résumé

Résumé

La aldea Oak Hill (41EK214) en el noreste de Texas es un asentamiento prehistórico (ca. A.D. 1150–1450) de los Caddos. Este pueblo fue completamente excavado a mediados de la década de 1990, antes de la actividad de mineria de lignito. Los análisis de los restos arquitectónicos, el fechado de radiocarbón calibrado, y cambios en las cerámicas decoradas, indican que el pueblo evolucionó en tres épocas en tiempo y espacio para formar diferentes comunidades compuestas por un número de unidades domésticas separadas. Emergieron en las dos últimas comunidades instituciones sociales de importancia (la plaza, un montículo de tierra, y estructuras especializadas con entradas extendidas) que unieron esta comunidad Caddo por cerca de 150–200 años (ca. A.D. 1250–1450).

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Copyright
Copyright © The Society for American Archaeology 2007

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