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The Allure of the Exotic: Reexamining the Use of Local and Distant Pipestone Quarries in Ohio Hopewell Pipe Caches

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Thomas E. Emerson
Affiliation:
Illinois State Archaeological Survey, 209 Nuclear Physics Lab, 23 East Stadium Drive, University of Illinois, Champaign, Illinois 61820 (teee@illinois.edu)
Kenneth B. Farnsworth
Affiliation:
Illinois State Archaeological Survey, 209 Nuclear Physics Lab, 23 East Stadium Drive, University of Illinois, Champaign, Illinois 61820 (teee@illinois.edu)
Sarah U. Wisseman
Affiliation:
Illinois State Archaeological Survey, 209 Nuclear Physics Lab, 23 East Stadium Drive, University of Illinois, Champaign, Illinois 61820 (teee@illinois.edu)
Randall E. Hughes
Affiliation:
Illinois State Geological Survey, 615 E. Peabody Drive, University of Illinois, Champaign, Illinois 61820
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Mary W. Helms’s observation that spatial distance often correlates with spiritual power has become an axiom in interpreting the role of exotic materials in societies. This is especially evident in explanations of the North American Hopewell Interaction Sphere. The circulation and accumulation of exotic materials in massive mortuary caches peaked during the Hopewell era (100 B.C. to A.D. 300). The premise that Hopewell smoking pipes were made in Ohio, primarily of local raw material, and circulated to foreign locations was an integral part of this interaction model. In this study we demonstrate, primarily using reflectance near-infrared spectroscopy (NIS), that early Hopewell Tremper Mound pipe raw-material acquisition focused on exotic pipestones from Illinois and Minnesota. By contrast, later Mound City cache pipes were almost exclusively made from local limestone and pipestone. The discovery of this shift in preference for and/or access to different quarry sources by Ohio Hopewell societies provides new perspectives on early Hopewell development and long-distance interaction.

Resumen

Resumen

La observación de Mary W. Helms de que la distancia espacial a menudo se correlaciona con el poder espiritual se ha convertido en un axioma a la hora de interpretar el papel de los materiales exóticos en las sociedades. Esto es especialmente evidente en las explicaciones de la Esfera de Interacción Norteamericana de Hopewell. La circulación y la acumulación de materiales exóticos en enormes depósitos mortuorios alcanzó su punto máximo durante la era Hopewell (100 A.C. al 300 D.C.). La premisa de que las pipas de Hopewell se hicieron en Ohio, principalmente de materias primas locales, y se distribuyeron a lugares extranjeros, fue una parte integral de este modelo de interacción. En este estudio demostramos, utilizando principalmente la espectroscopia de reflectando en el infrarrojo cercano (NIS), que la primera adquisición de las materias primas de la pipa de Hopewell Tremper Mound se centró en las pipas exóticas de piedra de Illinois y Minnesota. Por el contrario, más tarde las pipas de Mound City fueron hechas casi exclusivamente de piedra caliza y piedra de pipa locales. El descubrimiento de este cambio de preferencia y/o el acceso a diferentes fuentes de cantera de las sociedades de Ohio Hopewell proporciona nuevas perspectivas sobre los primeros desarrollos de Hopewell y la interacción de larga distancia.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 by the Society for American Archaeology.

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