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Introduction to the Theme: The Jerusalem Temple in History, Memory, and Ritual

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 November 2019

Hayim Lapin*
Affiliation:
University of Maryland
Marjorie Lehman
Affiliation:
The Jewish Theological Seminary
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Extract

The following group of essays emerged out of a seminar held at the Association for Jewish Studies conference in 2015. As section heads of Jewish History and Culture in Antiquity and Rabbinic Literature and Culture, tasked to think about how to address gaps in our fields, we recognized that despite a large amount of scholarship available on the Jerusalem Temple and its priesthood, there was a dearth of cross-disciplinary scholarly exchange, especially between ancient Jewish historians and those of us who engage in literary analysis of rabbinic sources. As a result, our divisions joined together to create “The Jerusalem Temple in History, Memory, and Ritual,” taking advantage of the “seminar” format at the conference. Twelve scholars, each working with different source material and employing different methodological approaches, participated.

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Introduction
Copyright
Copyright © Association for Jewish Studies 2019 

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References

1. We would like to thank the participants in the seminar, including Joan Branham, Matthew Grey, Oded Irshai, Adele Reinhartz, Daniel Schwartz, and Nathan Schumer, as well as our respondents, Chaya Halberstam, Jane Kanarek, and Seth Schwartz. Each of us who submitted articles here benefitted greatly from the discussions that ensued during our seminars at the AJS. We also thank Vivian Mann, who was an instrumental participant in our seminar and who took ill before she could revise her article for publication. She passed away on May 6, 2019. We will miss her attendance at the AJS and are grateful for her extraordinary contribution to the field of Jewish studies.

2. Eliav, Yaron, “The Temple Mount, the Rabbis and the Poetics of Memory,” Hebrew Union College Annual 74 (2003): 50Google Scholar, where he discusses Nora, Pierre, ed., Les lieux de memoire, 3 vols. (Paris: Gallimard, 1984), 1:xxxixGoogle Scholar; Nora, , Realms of Memory, trans. Kritzman, Lawrence D., 3 vols. (New York: Columbia University Press, 1996), 1:18Google Scholar.

3. Kalmin, Richard, Jewish Babylonia between Persia and Roman Palestine (New York: Oxford University Press, 2006), 186CrossRefGoogle Scholar. Also see Wimpfheimer's, Barry Scott book review of Jewish Babylonia between Persia and Roman Palestine, in the Journal of the American Academy of Religion 78, no. 1 (2010): 314Google Scholar, where he discusses this difficult leap from literature to history with regard to Kalmin's work; see as well Rosen-Zvi's, Ishay discussion in his review of Kalmin's book, AJS Review 32, no. 2 (2008): 416Google Scholar.

4. Eliade, Mircea, The Sacred and the Profane: The Nature of Religion, trans. Trask, W. R. (San Diego, CA: Harcourt Brace, 1959), 2065Google Scholar; Smith, Jonathan Z., To Take Place: Toward Theory in Ritual (Chicago, IL: Chicago University Press, 1987)Google Scholar; and for a critique of Smith see Grimes, Ronald L., “Jonathan Z. Smith's Theory of Ritual Space,” Religion 29 (1999): 261–73CrossRefGoogle Scholar.

5. The revelation of plans for a future Temple occurs already in Ezekiel 40–48.

6. See the contributions to Schwartz, Daniel, Weiss, Zeev, and Clements, Ruth, eds., Was 70 CE a Watershed in Jewish History? On Jews and Judaism before and after the Destruction of the Second Temple (Leiden: Brill, 2011)Google Scholar.

7. Swain, Simon, Hellenism and Empire: Language, Classicism, and Power in the Greek World, AD 50–250 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1996)Google Scholar. For a recent evaluation of The Syrian Goddess see Lightfoot, J. L., ed., On the Syrian Goddess (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003)Google Scholar.

8. For texts see Yahalom, Joseph and Swartz, Michael, eds. and trans., Avodah: Ancient Poems for Yom Kippur (University Park, PA: Penn State University Press, 2004), 5369Google Scholar.

9. Giebfried, John, “The Crusader Rebranding of Jerusalem's Temple Mount,” Comitatus 44 (2013): 7794CrossRefGoogle Scholar.

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