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Article contents

Word graphs in architectural design

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 November 2005

BAUKE DE VRIES
Affiliation:
Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven, The Netherlands
JORAN JESSURUN
Affiliation:
Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven, The Netherlands
NICOLE SEGERS
Affiliation:
Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven, The Netherlands
HENRI ACHTEN
Affiliation:
Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven, The Netherlands

Abstract

In computer-aided architectural design, words are an underemployed source of information. Through a series of case studies, we deduced a design annotation data model. All entities in this model can be captured from the design draft, except one: the word relation. Therefore, a system was developed that generates word graphs using single words from the draft as input. The system searches for semantic relations between words and for new intermediate words that can connect two existing words. The system has filters that select only those graphs that are considered interesting by the designers. The envisioned applications of word graphs in the context of computer-aided architectural design are to contribute to the architect's design and to enhance the fluency of the design. These expectations are met, but must be considered in relation to the architect's drafting behavior.

Type
Research Article
Information
AI EDAM , Volume 19 , Issue 4 , November 2005 , pp. 277 - 288
Copyright
© 2005 Cambridge University Press

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