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Zoning, Development Timing, and Agricultural Land Use at the Suburban Fringe: A Competing Risks Approach

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 September 2016

Diane Hite
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology, Auburn University
Brent Sohngen
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics, The Ohio State University
Josh Templeton
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics, The Ohio State University
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Abstract

Competing risks survival analysis is used to investigate tax and zoning policy impacts on residential, commercial, and industrial development timing in a rapidly growing Midwestern county. Industrial development appears both to precede and occur concurrently with residential development, while commercial development follows other types. Although residences appear to locate away from industrial land, zoning decisions favoring industry may attract rather than deter residential development within a jurisdiction. Regions with higher infrastructure taxes experience development later. Because school taxes fund local public goods important to homeowners, they have little influence on residential timing, but strong influences on industrial and commercial timing.

Type
Contributed Papers
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association 

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