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Effects of Socioeconomic and Demographic Factors on Consumption of Selected Food Nutrients

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 September 2016

Rodolfo M. Nayga Jr.
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Economics and Marketing, Rutgers University
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Abstract

The effects of socioeconomic and demographic factors on the consumption of food energy, protein, vitamin A, vitamin C, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, calcium, phosphorus, and iron are examined. Socioeconomic and demographic factors analyzed are urbanization, region, race, ethnicity, sex, employment status, food stamp participation, household size, weight, height, age, and income. Several of these factors significantly affect consumption of certain nutrients. Income is an important factor affecting the consumption of vitamin A, vitamin C, and calcium. Income elasticities are relatively small at low income levels. For example, income elasticities range from 0.016 for calcium to 0.123 for vitamin C at an income level of $20,000.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association 

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