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Support in old age in the changing society of Bangladesh

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 October 2002

ZARINA NAHAR KABIR
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, and Stockholm Gerontology Research Centre, Sweden.
MARTA SZEBEHELY
Affiliation:
Department of Social Work, Stockholm University, Sweden.
CAROL TISHELMAN
Affiliation:
Department of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, and Stockholm Hospital and Nursing Home Foundation, Sweden.

Abstract

The assumption that social and economic transitions in a country pose a threat to the provision of support to older people is questioned in this study. The study investigates the availability and sources of such material, practical and emotional support in urban and rural areas of Bangladesh. The support provided by older people towards household functioning is also explored. It was found from an interview survey of 701 individuals aged 60 years and older that the propensity to receive support was greater among rural older people than their urban counterparts. Gender differences were also observed, in that men were mainly providers of material support, and women of practical and emotional support. Among married older people, spouses were reported as important sources of emotional support for both elderly men and women, and some regional differences were observed. The data show mutuality in the provision of support between older people and their family members. It is evident that support to elderly people from their families is strong in Bangladesh, and that the socio-cultural dynamics of the society influence its provision.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
2002 Cambridge University Press

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