Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-747cfc64b6-cssqh Total loading time: 0.254 Render date: 2021-06-16T11:13:56.702Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Family and family-like interactions in households with round-the-clock paid foreign carers in Israel

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 May 2009

LIAT AYALON
Affiliation:
School of Social Work, Bar Ilan University, Israel.
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

This paper reports a study of family and family-like interactions and transfers, or exchanges of goods and resources, between paid, round-the-clock, Filipino home carers and those they care for in a sample of households in Israel. Qualitative interviews about their experiences and attitudes concerning the care role were conducted with 22 family members and 29 Filipino home-care workers. A thematic analysis of the interview data identified three major themes: the structure and internal dynamics of the adapted family or family-like system of care; the role of family members; and the role of Filipino home-care workers in the new system of care. Sons and daughters tended to appropriate the care-management positions and to reduce their social and emotional support for the care recipient. In contrast, spouse care-givers continued to provide some of the personal and emotional care even when a Filipino home-care worker was employed. Filipino home-care workers were made responsible for daily care and domestic routines and provided emotional and social care. It was found that family members do not relinquish their role as care-givers when round-the-clock foreign carers are on hand, but the nature of their role changes. The results suggest that foreign home-care workers' job description needs to be redefined to acknowledge the substantial social and emotional care that they provide.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Cambridge University Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Anderson, B. 2000. Doing the Dirty Work? The Global Politics of Domestic Labour. Zen, London.Google Scholar
Aronson, J. and Neysmith, S. M. 1996. You're not just there to do the work: depersonalizing policies and the exploitation of home-care workers' labor. Gender and Society, 10, 1, 5977.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ayalon, L. 2008. Evaluating the working conditions and exposure to abuse among Filipino home care workers in Israel: characteristics and clinical correlates. International Psychogeriatrics, 21, 1, 40–9.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ayalon, L. and Areán, P. A. 2004. Knowledge of Alzheimer's disease in four ethnic groups of older adults. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 19, 1, 51–7.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ayalon, L., Kaniel, M. and Rosenberg, L. 2008. Social workers' perspectives on care arrangements between vulnerable elders and foreign home-care workers: lessons from Israeli/Filipino caregiving arrangements. Home Health Care Services Quarterly, 27, 2, 121–42.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Berdes, C. and Eckert, J. M. 2007. The language of caring: nurse's aides' use of family metaphors conveys affective care. The Gerontologist, 47, 3, 340–9.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Borowski, A. and Yanay, U. 1997. Temporary and illegal labour migration: the Israeli experience. International Migration, 35, 4, 495508.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Brush, B. L. and Sochalski, J. 2007. International nurse migration: lessons from the Philippines. Policy Politics Nursing Practices, 8, 1, 3746.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Constable, N. 1997. Maid to Order in Hong Kong: Stories of Filipina Workers, Cornell University Press, Ithaca, New York.Google Scholar
Creswell, J. W. 1998. Qualitative Inquiry and Research Design: Choosing Among Five Traditions. Sage, Thousand Oaks, California.Google Scholar
Daatland, S. and Lowenstein, A. 2005. Intergenerational solidarity and the family–welfare state balance. European Journal of Ageing, 2, 3, 174–82.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ehrenreich, B. and Hochschild, A. R. 2000. Global Women: Nannies, Maids, and Sex Workers in the New Economy. Metropolitan, New York.Google Scholar
Freedom from Debt Coalition 1995. Flor Contemplacion: victim of mismanaged economy. Freedom from Debt Coalition Newsletter (Quezon City, Philippines), April 7.Google Scholar
Gott, M., Seymour, J., Bellamy, G., Clark, D. and Ahmedzai, S. 2004. Older people's views about home as a place of care at the end of life. Palliative Medicine, 18, 5, 460–7.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Guba, E. G. and Lincoln, Y. S. 1989. Fourth Generation Evaluation. Sage, Newbury Park, California.Google Scholar
Heller, E. 2003. The Treatment of Older Adults in Israel. Foreign Home-care Workers in Israel and Israeli Home Care Workers: Needs and Available Solutions. Haknesset Research and Information Center, Jerusalem (In Hebrew).Google Scholar
Karner, T. X. 1998. Professional caring: homecare workers as fictive kin. Journal of Aging Studies, 12, 1, 6982.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Miller, B. and Cafasso, L. 1992. Gender differences in caregiving: fact or artifact? The Gerontologist, 32, 4, 498507.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Montgomery, R. J. V. and Datwyler, M. M. 1990. Women and men in the caregiving role. Generations, 14 (Summer), 34–8.Google Scholar
Montgomery, R. J. V. and Kosloski, K. 1994. A longitudinal analysis of nursing home placement for dependent elders cared for by spouses vs. adult children. Journal of Gerontology: Social Sciences, 49, 2, S6274.Google ScholarPubMed
Neal, M. B., Ingersoll-Dayton, B. and Starrels, M. E. 1997. Gender and relationship differences in caregiving patterns and consequences among employed caregivers. The Gerontologist, 37, 6, 804–16.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Piercy, K. W. 2000. When it is more than a job: close relationships between home health aides and older clients. Journal of Aging and Health, 12, 3, 362–87.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rodgers, B. L. and Cowles, K. V. 1993. The qualitative research audit trail: a complex collection of documentation. Research in Nursing and Health, 16, 3, 219–26.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Roth, D. L., Haley, W. E., Wadley, V. G., Clay, O. J. and Howard, G. 2007. Race and gender differences in perceived caregiver availability for community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults. The Gerontologist, 47, 6, 721–9.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Salazar, Parrenas R. 2001. Servants of Globalization: Women, Migration and Domestic Work. Stanford University Press, Stanford, California.Google Scholar
Strauss, A. L. and Corbin, J. 1998. Basics of Qualitative Research: Techniques and Procedures for Developing Grounded Theory. Second edition, Sage, Thousand Oaks, California.Google Scholar
Sung, K. T. 1990. A new look at filial piety: ideals and practices of family-centered parent care in Korea. The Gerontologist, 30, 5, 610–7.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Weisblay, E. 2005. Employing Foreign Workers in the Nursing Industry to Work with Older Adults. Haknesset Research and Information Center, Jerusalem (In Hebrew).Google Scholar
40
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Family and family-like interactions in households with round-the-clock paid foreign carers in Israel
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Family and family-like interactions in households with round-the-clock paid foreign carers in Israel
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Family and family-like interactions in households with round-the-clock paid foreign carers in Israel
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *