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Islam or Christianity? The choices of the Wawa and the Kwanja of Cameroon

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 December 2011

Résumé

Cet article tente de répondre à deux questions. Premièrement, il essaye d'expliquer pourquoi les Wawa et les Kwanja (deux groupes voisins situés au Cameroun) se sont convertis à l'Islam et au Christianisme dans les années 1960, et il suggère qu'ils l'ont fait dans le but d'adopter une identité respectée, jugée plus “moderne” et associée à l'identité nationale. Deuxièmement, l'article analyse les raisons ayant motivé les Wawa à se convertir à l'lslam alors que les Kwanja ont en majorite choisi le Christianisme, et il explique leurs choix principalement en fonction de la manière dont ils interagissent et définissent leur propre identité vis-à-vis des Foulbé voisins.

Type
Contextualising conversion: the political and the personal
Information
Africa , Volume 69 , Issue 2 , April 1999 , pp. 257 - 278
Copyright
Copyright © International African Institute 1999

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