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Aeroelastic analysis through linear and non-linear methods: a summary of flutter prediction in the PUMA DARP

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 February 2016

N. V. Taylor
Affiliation:
University of Bristol
C. B. Allen
Affiliation:
University of Bristol
A. L. Gaitonde
Affiliation:
University of Bristol
D. P. Jones
Affiliation:
University of Bristol
G. A. Vio
Affiliation:
University of Manchester
J. E. Cooper
Affiliation:
University of Manchester
A. M. Rampurawala
Affiliation:
University of Glasgow
K. J. Badcock
Affiliation:
University of Glasgow
M. A. Woodgate
Affiliation:
University of Glasgow
M. J. de C. Henshaw
Affiliation:
BAE Systems

Abstract

This paper presents a comparison of linear and non-linear methods for the analysis of aeroelastic behaviour and flutter boundary prediction. The methods in question include NASTRAN and ZAERO, based on linear aerodynamics, and the non-linear coupled CFD-CSD methods RANSMB and PMB, developed at the Universities of Bristol and Glasgow respectively. The test cases used for this comparison are the MDO and AGARD 445.6 weakened wing. In general, it was found that the non-linear methods demonstrate excellent agreement with respect to pressure distributions, deflections, dynamic behaviour, and flutter boundary locations for both cases. This is in contrast to previous studies involving similar methods, where notable differences across the MDO span were found, and is taken to imply good performance of the CFD-CSD interpolation schemes employed here. While the linear methods produce similar flutter boundaries to the coupled codes for the aerodynamically simple AGARD 445.6 wing, results for the transonic ‘rooftop’ MDO wing design did not agree as well.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Royal Aeronautical Society 2006

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