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“Whole Pattern” XRD Interpretation of Mineralogical Variation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 March 2019

Ray E. Ferrell Jr.
Affiliation:
Louisiana State University Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A., 70803-4101
Lynn R. LaMotte
Affiliation:
Department of Experimental Statistics Louisiana State University Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A., 70803-4101
Wanda S. LeBlanc
Affiliation:
Louisiana State University Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A., 70803-4101
David E. Wilensky
Affiliation:
Louisiana State University Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A., 70803-4101
Lin Mao
Affiliation:
Department of Experimental Statistics Louisiana State University Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A., 70803-4101
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Abstract

All intensity data in a powder XRD pattern can be used to provide useful results for the interpretation of the mineralogical variability of geological samples. Simple statistical methods using Bonferroni's theorem permit the recognition of areas usually associated with mineral peaks where sample patterns are different at a predetermined level of confidence. Intensity/frequency histograms reveal subtle differences in low intensity regions of the XRD patterns that are also indicative of sample variability. These procedures facilitate the comparison of samples and may reduce the total analytical error because the weight percent determination can be eliminated.

Type
IX. XRD Applications: Detection Levitts, Superconductors, Organics, Minerals
Copyright
Copyright © International Centre for Diffraction Data 1991

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