Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-568f69f84b-l2zqg Total loading time: 0.16 Render date: 2021-09-21T12:29:32.589Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Wilderness Medicine Education

How to Choose the Right Resources for Archaeology Field Programs

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 March 2021

Seth C. Hawkins*
Affiliation:
Department of Emergency Medicine, Wake Forest University, Mead Hall, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27157, USA
Corey Winstead
Affiliation:
Wingate University, 220 North Camden Street, Wingate, NC 28174, USA
*Corresponding
(schawkin@wakehealth.edu, corresponding author)

Abstract

Wilderness medicine classes are widely available to archaeologists and field scientists, but because wilderness medicine is an unregulated field, knowing what the various courses and products mean can be difficult. Based on the education chapter in the recently published textbook Wilderness EMS, this article—written by same two authors as the book—explores a number of topics relevant for the field scientist, program director, or administrator seeking to obtain wilderness medicine training for archaeologists. The article first explores the history of wilderness medicine products and certificates available to interested parties. It then differentiates between the various products available today along with their benefits and limitations for the end user. Products and trainings described include certifications (including Wilderness First Aid [WFA], Wilderness Advanced First Aid [WAFA], Advanced Wilderness First Aid [AWFA], and Wilderness First Responder [WFR]), as well as single use or continuing education trainings (including Stop the Bleed, CPR, conference courses, and field schools). Particular attention is paid to the specific and actionable needs of a field scientist in remote areas.

Las clases de medicina del desierto están ampliamente disponibles para los arqueólogos y científicos de campo, pero como la medicina del desierto es un campo no regulado, saber lo que significan los diversos cursos y productos puede ser difícil. Este ensayo, basado en el capítulo de educación en el libro de texto Wilderness EMS recientemente publicado y escrito por sus dos autores, explora una serie de temas relevantes para el científico de campo, el director del programa o el administrador que buscan obtener capacitación en medicina silvestre para arqueólogos. El ensayo primero explora la historia de los productos y certificados de medicina silvestre disponibles para las partes interesadas, y luego diferencia entre los diversos productos disponibles en la actualidad y sus beneficios y limitaciones para el usuario final. Los productos y entrenamientos descritos incluyen certificaciones (incluyendo Wilderness First Aid [WFA], Wilderness Advanced First Aid [WAFA], Advanced Wilderness First Aid [AWFA] y Wilderness First Responder [WFR]), así como entrenamientos de un solo uso o educación continua (incluyendo Stop the Bleed, CPR, cursos de conferencia y escuelas de campo). Se presta especial atención a las necesidades específicas y prácticas de un científico de campo en áreas remotas.

Type
How to Series
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of Society for American Archaeology

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

American Board of Emergency Medicine 2020 Emergency Medical Services. Electronic document, www.abem.org/public/subspecialty-certification/emergency-medical-services/ems-overview, accessed July 13, 2020.Google Scholar
American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma 2020 Stop the Bleed. Electronic document, https://www.stopthebleed.org, accessed July 13, 2020.Google Scholar
American Society for Testing and Materials 1995 American Society for Testing and Materials F1616-95: Standard Guide for Training First Responders Who Practice in Wilderness, Delayed, or Prolonged Transport Settings. ASTM International, West Conshohocken, Pennsylvania.Google Scholar
Auerbach, Paul S. 2016 Medicine for the Outdoors: The Essential Guide to First Aid and Medical Emergencies. 6th ed. Elsevier, Philadelphia.Google Scholar
Auerbach, Paul S. (editor) 2017 Auerbach's Wilderness Medicine. 7th ed. Elsevier, Philadelphia.Google Scholar
Bennett, Brad L. 2012 Wilderness First Aid: Is It Time to Revisit Course Content? Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 23:203204.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bohonak, Jenni 2013 Doctors on Call in the Wild. Massachusetts General Hospital Global Health News. Electronic document, https://giving.massgeneral.org/doctors-on-call-wilderness-medicine/, accessed July 13, 2020.Google Scholar
Brown, William E. 2011 Your Transition Plan: From First Responder to Emergency Medical Responder (EMR). The Registry (newsletter), Fall 2011. National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians, Columbus, Ohio.Google Scholar
Cushing, Tracy A. 2020 Wilderness Medical Society. Wilderness Medicine Clinical Practice Guidelines. Electronic document, https://www.wms.org/research.asp?page=guidelines, accessed July 13, 2020.Google Scholar
DoT National Highway Safety Transportation Administration 2007 National EMS Scope of Practice Model. Electronic document, https://www.ems.gov/pdf/education/EMS-Education-for-the-Future-A-Systems-Approach/National_EMS_Scope_Practice_Model.pdf. Accessed July 13, 2020.Google Scholar
Duffey, Katey E. 2020 Changing Tracks. Katey Duffey (blog), January 24. Electronic document, kateyduffey.wordpress.com/2020/01/24/changing-tracks/, accessed July 12, 2020.Google Scholar
Eifling, Kurt P., and Klehm, Carla E. 2019 Medical Needs of Archaeology Field Camps—Improving Readiness and Response. Paper presented at the 84th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Albuquerque, New Mexico.Google Scholar
2020 CAMPS: Combined Anthropology Medical Preparation Survey, 2018. Current Anthropology 61:798807. DOI:10.1086/712004.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Evidence-Based Medicine Working Group 1992 Evidence-Based Medicine: A New Approach to Teaching the Practice of Medicine. Journal of the American Medical Association 268:24202425.Google Scholar
Forgey, William W. 2017 Wilderness Medicine: Beyond First Aid. 7th ed. Falcon Guides, Guilford, Connecticut.Google Scholar
Harper, Barbara L., and Harris, Stuart G. 2008 A Possible Approach for Setting a Mercury Risk-Based Action Level Based on Tribal Fish Ingestion Rates. Environmental Research 107:6068.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hawkins, Seth C. 2018 WEMS Systems. In Wilderness EMS, edited by Hawkins, Seth C., pp 2160. Wolters Kluwer, Philadelphia.Google Scholar
Hawkins, Seth C. 2020 Summaries of the Wilderness Medical Society Clinical Practice Guidelines. Wilderness Medicine Magazine. Updated May 10, 2020. Electronic document, https://wms.org/magazine/1191/WMS_Clinical_Practice_Guidelines, accessed July 13, 2020.Google Scholar
Hawkins, Seth C. (editor) 2018 Wilderness EMS, Wolters Kluwer, Philadelphia.Google Scholar
Hawkins, Seth C., and Bryan Simon, R. 2021 Ten Myths About Medical Emergencies and Medical Kits. Advances in Archaeological Practice 9:23–33.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hawkins, Seth C., Bryan Simon, R., Pearce Beissinger, J., and Simon, Deb 2017 Vertical Aid: Essential Wilderness Medicine for Climbers, Trekkers, and Mountaineers. Countryman Press, New York.Google Scholar
Hawkins, Seth C., Millin, Michael G., and Smith, Will 2017 Wilderness Emergency Medical Services and Response Systems. In Auerbach's Wilderness Medicine, 7th ed., edited by Auerbach, Paul S., pp. 12001212. Elsevier, Philadelphia.Google Scholar
Hawkins, Seth C., Millin, Michael G., and Smith, Will 2021 Care in the Wilderness. In Emergency Medical Services: Clinical Practice and Systems Oversight, Volume 2: Medical Oversight of EMS, 3rd ed., edited by Cone, David. C., in press. Wiley & Sons, Chichester, United Kingdom.Google Scholar
Houghton, Emily, Rhea, Casey, Finstad, Amanda, and Swingle, Grayson 2016 An Analysis of Wilderness First Responder Self-Efficacy. Fort Lewis College, Durango, Colorado.Google Scholar
Isaac, Jeffrey, and Johnson, David E. 2012 Wilderness and Rescue Medicine. 6th ed. Jones & Bartlett Learning, Burlington, Massachusetts.Google Scholar
Johnson, David E., Schimelpfenig, Tod, Hubbell, Frank, Frizzell, Lee, Nicolazzo, Paul, McEvoy, David, Weil, Carl, Cull, Andrew, and Kimmel, Nadia 2013 Minimum Guidelines and Scope of Practice for Wilderness First Aid. Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 24:456462.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Millin, Michael G., Johnson, David E., Schimelpfenig, Tod, Conover, Keith, Sholl, Matthew, Busko, Jonnathan, Alter, Rachael, Smith, Will, Symonds, Jennifer, Taillac, Peter, and Hawkins, Seth C. 2017 Medical Oversight, Educational Core Content, and Proposed Scopes of Practice of Wilderness EMS Providers: A Joint Approach Developed by Wilderness EMS Educators, Medical Directors, and Regulators Using a Delphi Approach. Prehospital Emergency Care 28:19.Google Scholar
North Carolina State Legislature 2020 10 NCAC 13P .0509: Credentialing of Individuals to Administer Lifesaving Treatment to Persons Suffering an Adverse Reaction to Agents That Might Cause Anaphylaxis. Electronic document, https://info.ncdhhs.gov/dhsr/EMS/pdf/epiform.pdf, accessed July 13, 2020.Google Scholar
Sackett, David L., Rosenberg, William M. C., Muir Gray, J. A., Brian Haynes, R., and Scott Richardson, W. 1996 Evidence Based Medicine: What It Is and What It Isn't. British Medical Journal 268:7172.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schimelpfenig, Tod 2016 NOLS Wilderness Medicine. 6th ed. Stackpole Books, Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania.Google Scholar
Schumann, Scott A., Schimelpfenig, Tod, Sibthorp, Jim, and Collins, Rachel H. 2012 An Examination of Wilderness First Aid Knowledge, Self-Efficacy, and Skill Retention. Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 23:281287.Google ScholarPubMed
Simon, R. Bryan 2016 Level of Wilderness First Aid Training and Knowledge Retention of Rock Climbers in the United States. Master's thesis, Department of Infection, Immunity, and Inflammation, University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom.Google Scholar
Warden, Craig R., Millin, Michael G., Hawkins, Seth C., and Bradley, Richard N. 2012 Medical Direction of Wilderness and Other Operational Emergency Medical Services Programs. Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 23:3743.Google ScholarPubMed
Weber, Holly A 1996 An Update on Wilderness Medicine Training. Wilderness Medicine Newsletter 7:3133.Google Scholar
Weil, Carl, and Schimelpfenig, Tod 2016 Wilderness First Responder (WFR) Scope of Practice (SOP). Wilderness Medicine Magazine 33(1). https://wms.org/magazine/1176/WFR-Scope-Of-Practice, accessed July 13, 2020.Google Scholar
Welch, Thomas R., Clement, Kent, and Berman, Dene 2009 Wilderness First Aid: Is There an “Industry Standard?” Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 20:113117.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wilderness Medical Society Curriculum Committee 1999 Wilderness First Responder: Recommended Minimum Course Topics. Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 10:1319.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wilderness Medicine Outfitters Why Choose WMO. Electronic document, http://wildernessmedicine.com/why-choose-wmo, accessed July 13, 2020.Google Scholar
Wilderness Medicine Training Center 2016 Things to Think about before Choosing a Wilderness Medicine Provider. Wilderness Medicine Training Center (blog), November 29. Electronic document, www.wildmedcenter.com/blog/things-to-think-about-before-choosing-a-wilderness-medicine-provider, accessed July 13, 2020.Google Scholar
Winstead, Corey, and Hawkins, Seth C. 2018 Wilderness EMS Education. In Wilderness EMS, edited by Hawkins, Seth C., pp. 6182. Wolters Kluwer, Philadelphia.Google Scholar
5
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Wilderness Medicine Education
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Wilderness Medicine Education
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Wilderness Medicine Education
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *