Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-cf9d5c678-5wlnc Total loading time: 0.18 Render date: 2021-07-31T00:44:15.631Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Using Multistaged Magnetic Survey and Excavation to Assess Community Settlement Organization: A Case Study from the Central Peninsular Gulf Coast of Florida

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 December 2019

Christina Perry Sampson
Affiliation:
Department of Anthropology, University of Michigan, 610 E. University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI48109-1259, USA
Timothy J. Horsley
Affiliation:
Horsley Archaeological Prospection LLC, 518 Park Avenue, DeKalb, IL60115, USA
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Integrating geophysical survey with the study of community settlement patterns can be challenging because of cultural and environmental factors including (1) site formation and house preservation, (2) the coordination of domestic tasks at extra-household scales, and (3) the survey environment of the study area. In this article, we present the results of a program of geophysical survey comprising magnetic susceptibility and magnetometry at Weeden Island (8Pi1)—a shell-bearing, wooded site with nearly pure sand soils on the Gulf Coast of Florida. Combining remote sensing techniques mitigated some of the challenges of surveying forested terrain while providing insight into community organization at a site with minimal preserved structural remains. Compared with previous traditional surveys of the area, the geophysical survey extended the recognized boundaries of occupational activity, provided additional definition to the spatial structure of deposits, and allowed us to identify specific domestic features. Excavations at each area of intensive occupation provided evidence about the organization of the domestic economy at the site and showed the potential of this approach to reveal significant patterns of community settlement.

La integración de prospecciones geofísicas con la investigación de patrones de asentamientos comunitarios puede ser desafiante por causo de algunos factores culturales y ambientales incluyendo (1) los procesos de formación de sitios y la preservación de restos domésticos, (2) la coordinación de tareas domesticas en escalas supra-domésticas, y (3) el medio ambiente moderno de la región de la investigación. En este trabajo, presentamos los resultados de una programa de prospección geofísica consta de susceptibilidad magnética y magnetomatría en el sitio de Weeden Island (8Pi1), un sitio boscoso y con cantidades de concha en la costa del Golfo de Florida. La combinación de varias técnicas geofísicas mitiga algunas desafíos de la prospección en terrenos boscosos mientras proporciona comprensión de la organización comunitaria de algún sitio sin preservación de restos arquitectónicos. Comparando conLa integración de prospecciones geofísicas con la investigación de patrones de asentamientos comunitarios puede ser desafiante por causo de algunos factores culturales y ambientales incluyendo (1) los procesos de formación de sitios y la preservación de restos domésticos, (2) la coordinación de tareas domesticas en escalas supra-domésticas, y (3) el medio ambiente moderno de la región de la investigación. En este trabajo, presentamos los resultados de una programa de prospección geofísica consta de susceptibilidad magnética y magnetomatría en el sitio de Weeden Island (8Pi1), un sitio boscoso y con cantidades de concha en la costa del Golfo de Florida. La combinación de varias técnicas geofísicas mitiga algunas desafíos de la prospección en terrenos boscosos mientras proporciona comprensión de la organización comunitaria de algún sitio sin preservación de restos arquitectónicos. Comparando con prospecciones tradicionales anteriores del área, la prospección geofísica extendió los límites de las actividades domésticas, proporcionó más definición a los patrones espaciales de los depósitos, y nos permite a identificar rasgos domésticos específicos. Excavaciones en cada área de ocupación intensiva proporcionó evidencia sobre la organización de la economía doméstica en el sitio y mostró la potencial de este método para revelar patrones significativos de asentamientos comunitarios.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright 2019 © Society for American Archaeology

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Aspinall, Arnold, Gaffney, Chris, and Schmidt, Armin 2008 Magnetometry for Archaeologists. AltaMira Press, Lanham, Maryland.Google Scholar
Austin, Robert J. 1995 Yat Kitischee: A Prehistoric Coastal Hamlet 100 BC–AD 1200. Janus Research. Submitted to the Pinellas County Board of County Commissioners. On file with the Florida Division of Historical Resources, Tallahassee, Florida.Google Scholar
Austin, Robert J. 2000 Microlithic Drills from the Anderson Mound at Jungle Prado: Possible Evidence for Late Prehistoric Craft Production on the Gulf Coast of Florida. North American Archaeologist 21:291321.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Austin, Robert J., and Mitchem, Jeffrey M. 2014 Chronology, Site Formation, and the Woodland-Mississippian Transition at Bayshore Homes. Southeastern Archaeology 33:6886.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Austin, Robert J., Mitchem, Jeffrey M., Fradkin, Arlene, Foss, John E., Drwiega, Shanna, and Allred, Linda 2008 Bayshore Homes Archaeological Survey and National Register Evaluation. Central Gulf Coast Archaeological Society. Submitted to the Bureau of Historic Preservation, Florida Department of State. On file with the Florida Division of Historical Resources, Tallahassee, Florida.Google Scholar
Barrier, Casey R., and Horsley, Timothy J. 2014 Shifting Communities: Demographic Profiles of Early Village Population Growth and Decline in the Central American Bottom. American Antiquity 79:295313.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Binford, Lewis R. 1983 In Pursuit of the Past: Decoding the Archaeological Record. University of California Press, Berkeley.Google Scholar
Blanton, Richard E. 1994 Houses and Households: A Comparative Study. Plenum, New York.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bullen, Ripley P. 1955 Archaeology of the Tampa Bay Area, Florida. Florida Historical Quarterly 34:5163.Google Scholar
Bullen, Ripley P. 1978 Tocobaga Indians and the Safety Harbor Culture. In Tacachale: Essays on the Indians of Florida and Southeastern Georgia during the Historic Period, edited by Milanich, Jerald T. and Proctor, Samuel, pp. 5058. University Press of Florida, Gainesville.Google Scholar
Clark, Anthony J. 1990 Seeing beneath the Soil: Prospecting Methods in Archaeology. BT Batsford, London.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Costin, Cathy Lynne 1991 Craft Specialization: Issues in Defining, Documenting, and Explaining the Organization of Production. Archaeological Method and Theory 3:156.Google Scholar
Dalan, Rinita A. 2006 Magnetic Susceptibility. In Remote Sensing in Archaeology: An Explicitly North American Perspective, edited by Johnson, Jay K., pp. 161203. University of Alabama Press, Tuscaloosa.Google Scholar
Dalan, Rinita A. 2008 A Review of the Role of Magnetic Susceptibility in Archaeogeophysical Studies in the USA: Recent Developments and Prospects. Archaeological Prospection 15:131.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Davis, Jera R., Walker, Chester P., and Blitz, John H. 2015 Remote Sensing as Community Settlement Analysis at Moundville. American Antiquity 80:161169.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dearing, John A. 1999 Environmental Magnetic Susceptibility: Using the Bartington MS2 System. Bartington Instruments Ltd., Manual OM0409. Electronic document, https://gmw.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/JDearing-Handbook-OM0409.pdf, accessed November 18, 2019.Google Scholar
Fassbinder, Jörg W. E., and Stanjek, Helge 1993 Occurrence of Bacterial Magnetite in Soils from Archaeological Sites. Archaeologia Polona 31:117128.Google Scholar
Fewkes, Jesse Walter 1924 Preliminary Archeological Explorations at Weeden Island, Florida. Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections 76(13):126.Google Scholar
Flannery, Kent V. 1972 The Origins of the Village as a Settlement Type in Mesoamerica and the Near East: A Comparative Study. Warner Modular Publications, Andover, Massachusetts.Google Scholar
Flannery, Kent V. 1976 The Early Mesoamerican Village. Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
Flannery, Kent V. 2002 The Origins of the Village Revisited: From Nuclear to Extended Households. American Antiquity 67:417433.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gaffney, Chris F., and Gater, John 2003 Revealing the Buried Past: Geophysics for Archaeologists. Tempus, Stroud, United Kingdom.Google Scholar
Haley, Bryan 2014 The Big Picture at Hollywood: Geophysical and Archaeological Investigations at a Mississippian Mound Centre. Archaeological Prospection 21:3947.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Henry, Edward R., Laracuente, Nicolas R., Case, Jared S., and Johnson, Jay K. 2014 Incorporating Multistaged Geophysical Data into Regional-Scale Models: A Case Study from an Adena Burial Mound in Central Kentucky. Archaeological Prospection 21:1526.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hirth, Kenneth G. 1993 The Household as an Analytical Unit: Problems in Method and Theory. Prehispanic Domestic Units in Western Mesoamerica: Studies of the Household, Compound, and Residence, edited by Santley, Robert S. and Hirth, Kenneth G., pp. 2136. CRC Press, Boca Raton, Florida.Google Scholar
Hodgetts, Lisa, Millaire, Jean-Francois, Eastaugh, Edward, and Chapdelaine, Claude 2016 The Untapped Potential of Magnetic Survey in the Identification of Precontact Archaeological Sites in Wooded Areas. Advances in Archaeological Practice 4:4154.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Horsley, Timothy J., and Wilbourn, D. 2009 Destriping Linears – A New Approach to an Old Problem. ISAP News 21:35.Google Scholar
Horsley, Timothy, Wright, Alice, and Barrier, Casey 2014 Prospecting for New Questions: Integrating Geophysics to Define Anthropological Research Objectives and Inform Excavation Strategies at Monumental Sites. Archaeological Prospection 21:7586.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hutchinson, Dale L. 2006 Tatham Mound and the Bioarchaeology of European Contact: Disease and Depopulation in Central Gulf Coast Florida. University Press of Florida, Gainesville.Google Scholar
Jackson, Kendal, Southard, Elizabeth, O'Donnell, Sharlene, and Arthur, John 2018 Estimating Crown Conch (Melongena corona) Tissue Weight from Archaeological Shell Measurements: An Allometric Methodology for Coastal Historical Ecological Research. Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports 21:107116.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Johnson, Jay K. 2006 A Comparative Guide to Applications. In Remote Sensing in Archaeology: An Explicitly North American Perspective, edited by Johnson, Jay K., pp. 305320. University of Alabama Press, Tuscaloosa.Google Scholar
Kolianos, Phyllis E., and Austin, Robert J. 2012 Report on the Excavation and Preservation of a Prehistoric Dugout Canoe, Weedon Island Preserve Gateway Tract, Pinellas County, Florida. On file with the Florida Division of Historical Resources, Tallahassee, Florida.Google Scholar
Kozuch, Laura 1986 An Overview of Faunal Lists from Selected Safety Harbor Sites. Manuscript on file. Department of Anthropology, Florida Museum of Natural History, Gainesville.Google Scholar
Kroll, Ellen M., and Douglas Price, T. 1991 The Interpretation of Archaeological Spatial Patterning. Springer Science and Business Media, New York.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kvamme, Kenneth L. 2003 Multidimensional Prospecting in North American Great Plains Village Sites. Archaeological Prospection 10:131142.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kvamme, Kenneth L. 2006 Magnetometry: Nature's Gift to Archaeology. In Remote Sensing in Archaeology: An Explicitly North American Perspective, edited by Johnson, Jay K., pp. 205233. University of Alabama Press, Tuscaloosa.Google Scholar
Kvamme, Kenneth L., Johnson, Jay K., and Haley, Bryan 2006 Multiple Methods Surveys: Case Studies. In Remote Sensing in Archaeology: An Explicitly North American Perspective, edited by Johnson, Jay K., pp. 251268. University of Alabama Press, Tuscaloosa.Google Scholar
Linford, N. T. 2004 Magnetic Ghosts: Mineral Magnetic Measurements on Roman and Anglo-Saxon Graves. Archaeological Prospection 11:167180.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Luer, George M. 1992 The Boylston Mound: A Safety Harbor Period Shell Midden; with Notes on the Paleoenvironment of Southern Sarasota Bay. Florida Anthropologist 45:266279.Google Scholar
Luer, George M. 2014 New Insights on the Woodland and Mississippi Periods of West-Peninsular Florida. In New Histories of Pre-Columbian Florida, edited by Wallis, Neill J. and Randall, Asa R., pp. 7493. University Press of Florida, Gainesville.Google Scholar
Luer, George M., and Almy, Marion M. 1981 Temple Mounds of the Tampa Bay Area. Florida Anthropologist 34:127155.Google Scholar
Marquardt, William, and Walker, Karen 2012 Southwest Florida during the Mississippian Period. In Late Prehistoric Florida: Archaeology at the Edge of the Mississippian World, edited by Ashley, Keith and White, Nancy Marie, pp. 2961. University Press of Florida, Gainesville.Google Scholar
Mehrer, Mark 2000 Heterarchy and Hierarchy: The Community Plan as Institution in Cahokia's Polity. In The Archaeology of Communities: A New World Perspective, edited by Canuto, Marcello and Yaeger, Jason, pp. 4457. Routledge, London.Google Scholar
Milanich, Jerald T. 1994 Archaeology of Precolumbian Florida. University Press of Florida, Gainesville.Google Scholar
Milanich, Jerald T., and Hudson, Charles M. 1993 Hernando de Soto and the Indians of Florida. University Press of Florida, Gainesville.Google Scholar
Mitchem, Jeffrey M. 1989 Redefining Safety Harbor: Late Prehistoric/Protohistoric Archaeology in West Peninsular Florida. PhD dissertation, Department of Anthropology, University of Florida, Gainesville.Google Scholar
Mitchem, Jeffrey M. 1996 The Old Okahumpka Site (8LA57): Late Prehistoric Iconography and Mississippian Influence in Peninsular Florida. Florida Anthropologist 49:225237.Google Scholar
Mitchem, Jeffrey M. 2012 Safety Harbor: Mississippian Influence in the Circum-Tampa Bay Region. In Late Prehistoric Florida: Archaeology at the Edge of the Mississippian World, edited by Ashley, Keith and White, Nancy Marie, pp. 172185. University Press of Florida, Gainesville.Google Scholar
Mullins, C. E. 1974 The Magnetic Properties of the Soil and Their Application to Archaeological Prospecting. Archaeo-Physika 5:143347.Google Scholar
Nash, Donna J. 2009 Household Archaeology in the Andes. Journal of Archaeological Research 17:205261.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
O'Donnell, Sharlene 2015 The Weedon Island Seascape: Zooarchaeological Findings at Weedon Island Archaeological Site (8Pi1). Master's thesis, University of South Florida, St. Petersburg.Google Scholar
Peregrine, Peter 1992 Social Change in the Woodland-Mississippian Transition: A Study of Household and Community Patterns in the American Bottom. North American Archaeologist 13:131147.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pluckhahn, Thomas J. 2010 Household Archaeology in the Southeastern United States: History, Trends, and Challenges. Journal of Archaeological Research 18:331385.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Prentiss, Anna Marie, Cross, Guy, Foor, Thomas A., Hogan, Mathew, Markle, Dirk, and Clarke, David S. 2008 Evolution of a Late Prehistoric Winter Village on the Interior Plateau of British Columbia: Geophysical Investigations, Radiocarbon Dating, and Spatial Analysis of the Bridge River Site. American Antiquity 73:5981.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sampson, Christina Perry 2019 Safety Harbor at the Weeden Island Site: Late Pre-Columbian Craft, Community, and Complexity on Florida's Gulf Coast. Deep Blue. https://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/handle/2027.42/149830, accessed August 1, 2019.Google Scholar
Sears, William H. 1971 The Weeden Island Site, St. Petersburg, Florida. Florida Anthropologist 24:5260.Google Scholar
Simpson, Terrance L. 1998 The Narvaez/Anderson Site (8Pi54): A Safety Harbor Culture Shell Mound and Midden—AD 1000–1600. Central Gulf Coast Archaeological Society, Pinellas Park, Florida.Google Scholar
Thompson, Victor D., Arnold, Philip J., Pluckhahn, Thomas J., and Vanderwarker, Amber M. 2011 Situating Remote Sensing in Anthropological Archaeology. Archaeological Prospection 18:195213.Google Scholar
Thompson, Victor D., Marquardt, William H., and Walker, Karen J. 2014 A Remote Sensing Perspective on Shoreline Modification, Canal Construction, and Household Trajectories at Pineland along Florida's Southeastern Gulf Coast. Archaeological Prospection 21:5973.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tite, M. S., and Mullins, C. E. 1971 Enhancement of the Magnetic Susceptibility of Soils on Archaeological Sites. Archaeometry 13:209219.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
USDA-NRCS 2018 Web Soil Survey. U.S. Department of Agriculture: Natural Resources Conservation Service. Electronic document, http://websoilsurvey.nrcs.usda.gov/app/WebSoilSurvey.aspx, accessed November 19, 2019.Google Scholar
Weisman, Brent R., Dean, Jonathon, O'Brien, Matthew, and Collins, Lori 2005 Comprehensive Cultural Resource Survey of the Weedon Island Preserve, Pinellas County, Florida. University of South Florida. On file with the Florida Division of Historical Resources, Tallahassee, Florida.Google Scholar
Wiessner, Polly 1982 Risk, Reciprocity, and Social Influences on Kung San Economics. In Politics and History in Band Societies, edited by Leacock, Eleanor and Lee, Richard, pp. 6184. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.Google Scholar
Wilk, Richard R., and Rathje, William L. 1982 Household Archaeology. American Behavioral Scientist 25:617639.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Willey, Gordon R. 1949 Archaeology of the Florida Gulf Coast. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
Worth, John 2014 Discovering Florida: First Contact Narratives from Spanish Expeditions along the Lower Gulf Coast. University Press of Florida, Gainesville.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
1
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Using Multistaged Magnetic Survey and Excavation to Assess Community Settlement Organization: A Case Study from the Central Peninsular Gulf Coast of Florida
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Using Multistaged Magnetic Survey and Excavation to Assess Community Settlement Organization: A Case Study from the Central Peninsular Gulf Coast of Florida
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Using Multistaged Magnetic Survey and Excavation to Assess Community Settlement Organization: A Case Study from the Central Peninsular Gulf Coast of Florida
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *