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Numerical Investigation of “Frog-Leap” Mechanisms of Three Particles Aligned Moving in an Inclined Channel Flow

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 March 2015

Xiao-Dong Niu
Affiliation:
College of Eengineering, Shantou University, Shantou 515063, China Energy Conversion Research Center, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyoto 630-0321, Japan
Ping Hu
Affiliation:
College of Eengineering, Shantou University, Shantou 515063, China
Xing-Wei Zhang*
Affiliation:
College of Eengineering, Shantou University, Shantou 515063, China
Hui Meng
Affiliation:
College of Eengineering, Shantou University, Shantou 515063, China
Hiroshi Yamaguchi
Affiliation:
Energy Conversion Research Center, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyoto 630-0321, Japan
Yuhiro Iwamoto
Affiliation:
Energy Conversion Research Center, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyoto 630-0321, Japan
*
*Corresponding author. Email: zhangxw@stu.edu.cn (X. W. Zhang)
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Abstract

Intrigued by our recent experimental work (H. Yamaguchi and X. D. Niu, J. Fluids Eng., 133 (2011), 041302), the present study numerically investigate the flow-structure interactions (FSI) of three rigid circular particles aligned moving in an inclined channel flow at intermediate Reynolds numbers by using a momentum-exchanged immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method. A ”frog-leap” phenomenon observed in the experiment is successfully captured by the present simulation and flow characteristics and underlying FSI mechanisms of it are explored by examining the effects of the channel inclined angles and Reynolds numbers. It is found that the asymmetric difference of the vorticity distributions on the particle surface is the main cause of the “frog-leap” when particle moves in the boundary layer near the lower channel boundary.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Global-Science Press 2015 

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Numerical Investigation of “Frog-Leap” Mechanisms of Three Particles Aligned Moving in an Inclined Channel Flow
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