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A High-Order Numerical Method to Study Three-Dimensional Hydrodynamics in a Natural River

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 March 2015

Luyu Shen
Affiliation:
College of Marine Sciences, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China College of Atmospheric Sciences, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China
Changgen Lu*
Affiliation:
College of Marine Sciences, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China
Weiguo Wu
Affiliation:
Department of Engineering Mechanics, China University of Petroleum, Dongying 266555, China
Shifeng Xue
Affiliation:
Department of Engineering Mechanics, China University of Petroleum, Dongying 266555, China
*
*Corresponding author. Email: shenluyu99@foxmail.com (L. Shen), cglu@nuist.edu.cn (C. Lu), mailtowwg@gmail.com (W. Wu), xuesf@126.com (S. Xue)
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Abstract

A high-order numerical method for three-dimensional hydrodynamics is presented. The present method applies high-order compact schemes in space and a Runge-Kutta scheme in time to solve the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with the k-ε turbulence model in an orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system. In addition, a two-dimensional equation is derived from the depth-averaged momentum equations to predict the water level. The proposed method is first validated by its application to simulate flow in a 180° curved laboratory flume. It is found that the simulated results agree with measurements and are better than those from SIMPLEC algorithm. Then the method is applied to study three-dimensional hydrodynamics in a natural river, and the simulated results are in accordance with measurements.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Global-Science Press 2015 

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