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Increased serum levels of serine enantiomers in patients with depression

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 October 2015

Kenji Hashimoto*
Affiliation:
Division of Clinical Neuroscience, Chiba University Center for Forensic Mental Health, Chiba, Japan
Taisuke Yoshida
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba, Japan
Masatomo Ishikawa
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba, Japan
Yuko Fujita
Affiliation:
Division of Clinical Neuroscience, Chiba University Center for Forensic Mental Health, Chiba, Japan
Tomihisa Niitsu
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba, Japan
Michiko Nakazato
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba, Japan Research Center for Child Mental Development, Chiba University Center for Forensic Mental Health, Chiba, Japan Department of Child Psychiatry, Chiba University Hospital, Chiba, Japan
Hiroyuki Watanabe
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba, Japan Division of Medical Treatment and Rehabilitation, Chiba University Center for Forensic Mental Health, Chiba, Japan
Tsuyoshi Sasaki
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba, Japan Department of Child Psychiatry, Chiba University Hospital, Chiba, Japan
Akihiro Shiina
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba, Japan Department of Child Psychiatry, Chiba University Hospital, Chiba, Japan
Tasuku Hashimoto
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba, Japan
Nobuhisa Kanahara
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba, Japan Division of Medical Treatment and Rehabilitation, Chiba University Center for Forensic Mental Health, Chiba, Japan
Tadashi Hasegawa
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba, Japan
Masayo Enohara
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba, Japan
Atsushi Kimura
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba, Japan
Masaomi Iyo
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba, Japan Division of Medical Treatment and Rehabilitation, Chiba University Center for Forensic Mental Health, Chiba, Japan Department of Child Psychiatry, Chiba University Hospital, Chiba, Japan
*Corresponding
Dr. Kenji Hashimoto, Division of Clinical Neuroscience, Chiba University Center for Forensic Mental Health, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chiba 260-8670, Japan. Tel: +81-43-226-2517; Fax: +81-43-226-2561; E-mail: hashimoto@faculty.chiba-u.jp

Abstract

Objective

Glutamatergic neurotransmission via the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor is integral to the pathophysiology of depression. This study was performed to examine whether amino acids related to NMDA receptor neurotransmission are altered in the serum of patients with depression.

Method

We measured the serum levels of d-serine, l-serine, glycine, glutamate and glutamine in patients with depression (n=70), and age-matched healthy subjects (n=78).

Results

Serum levels of d-serine and l-serine in patients with depression were significantly higher than those of healthy controls (p<0.001). In contrast, serum levels of glycine, glutamate and glutamine did not differ between the two groups. Interestingly, the ratio of l-serine to glycine in patients was significantly higher than that of healthy controls (p<0.001).

Conclusion

This study suggests that serine enantiomers may be peripheral biomarkers for depression, and that abnormality in the d-serine-l-serine-glycine cycle plays a role in the pathophysiology of depression.

Type
Short Communications
Copyright
© Scandinavian College of Neuropsychopharmacology 2015 

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