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Pythagorean Women

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 July 2022

Caterina Pellò
Affiliation:
University College London and Harvard Center for Hellenic Studies

Summary

The Pythagorean women are a group of female philosophers who were followers of Pythagoras and are credited with authoring a series of letters and treatises. In both stages of the history of Pythagoreanism – namely, the fifth-century Pythagorean societies and the Hellenistic Pythagorean writings – the Pythagorean woman is viewed as an intellectual, a thinker, a teacher, and a philosopher. The purpose of this Element is to answer the question: what kind of philosopher is the Pythagorean woman? The traditional picture of the Pythagorean female sage is that of an expert of the household. The author argues that the available evidence is more complex and conveys the idea of the Pythagorean woman as both an expert on the female sphere and a well-rounded thinker philosophising about the principles of the cosmos, human society, the immortality of the soul, numbers, and harmonics.
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Online ISBN: 9781009026864
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication: 28 July 2022

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Pythagorean Women
  • Caterina Pellò, University College London and Harvard Center for Hellenic Studies
  • Online ISBN: 9781009026864
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Pythagorean Women
  • Caterina Pellò, University College London and Harvard Center for Hellenic Studies
  • Online ISBN: 9781009026864
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Pythagorean Women
  • Caterina Pellò, University College London and Harvard Center for Hellenic Studies
  • Online ISBN: 9781009026864
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