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Postcognitivist Beckett

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 May 2020

Olga Beloborodova
Affiliation:
Universiteit Antwerpen, Belgium

Summary

The aim of this Element is to offer a reassessment of Beckett's alleged Cartesianism using the theoretical framework of extended cognition – a cluster of present-day philosophical theories that question the mind's brain-bound nature and see cognition primarily as a process of interaction between the human brain and the environment it operates in. The principal argument defended here is that, despite the Cartesian bias introduced by early Beckett scholarship, Beckett's fictional minds are not isolated 'skullscapes'. Instead, they are grounded in interaction with their fictional storyworlds, however impoverished those may have become in the later part of his writing career.
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Online ISBN: 9781108771108
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication: 04 June 2020
Copyright
© Olga Beloborodova 2020

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