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Phonetics and Phonology in Multilingual Language Development

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 July 2023

Ulrike Gut
Affiliation:
Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Germany
Romana Kopečková
Affiliation:
Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Germany
Christina Nelson
Affiliation:
Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Germany

Summary

This Element focuses on phonetic and phonological development in multilinguals and presents a novel methodological approach to it within Complex Dynamic Systems Theory (CDST). We will show how the traditional conceptualisations of acquisition with a strong focus on linear, incremental development with a stable endpoint can be complemented by a view of language development as emergent, self-organised, context-dependent and highly variable across learners. We report on a longitudinal study involving 16 learners with L1 German, L2 English and L3 Polish. Over their ten months of learning Polish, the learners' perception and production of various speech sounds and phonological processes in all of their languages were investigated. Auditory and acoustic analyses were applied together with group and individual learner statistical analyses to trace the dynamic changes of their multilingual phonological system over time. We show how phonetic and phonological development is feature-dependent and inter-connected and how learning experience affects the process.
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Online ISBN: 9781108992527
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication: 31 August 2023

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Phonetics and Phonology in Multilingual Language Development
  • Ulrike Gut, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Germany, Romana Kopečková, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Germany, Christina Nelson, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Germany
  • Online ISBN: 9781108992527
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Phonetics and Phonology in Multilingual Language Development
  • Ulrike Gut, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Germany, Romana Kopečková, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Germany, Christina Nelson, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Germany
  • Online ISBN: 9781108992527
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Phonetics and Phonology in Multilingual Language Development
  • Ulrike Gut, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Germany, Romana Kopečková, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Germany, Christina Nelson, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Germany
  • Online ISBN: 9781108992527
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