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The Ethical Commonwealth in History

Peace-making as the Moral Vocation of Humanity

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 July 2019

Philip J. Rossi
Affiliation:
Marquette University, Wisconsin

Summary

The 'ethical commonwealth', the central social element in Kant's account of religion, provides the church, as 'the moral people of God', with a role in establishing a cosmopolitan order of peace. This role functions within an interpretive realignment of Kant's critical project that articulates its central concern as anthropological: critically disciplined reason enables humanity to enact peacemaking as its moral vocation in history. Within this context, politics and religion are not peripheral elements in the critical project. They are, instead, complementary social modalities in which humanity enacts its moral vocation to bring lasting peace among all peoples.
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Online ISBN: 9781108529686
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication: 04 July 2019
Copyright
© Philip J. Rossi 2019

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The Ethical Commonwealth in History
  • Philip J. Rossi, Marquette University, Wisconsin
  • Online ISBN: 9781108529686
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The Ethical Commonwealth in History
  • Philip J. Rossi, Marquette University, Wisconsin
  • Online ISBN: 9781108529686
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The Ethical Commonwealth in History
  • Philip J. Rossi, Marquette University, Wisconsin
  • Online ISBN: 9781108529686
Available formats
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