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Eastern Philosophy of Religion

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 September 2022

Victoria S. Harrison
Affiliation:
Universidade de Macau

Summary

This Element selectively examines a range of ideas and arguments drawn from the philosophical traditions of South and East Asia, focusing on those that are especially relevant to the philosophy of religion. The Element introduces key debates about the self and the nature of reality that unite the otherwise highly diverse philosophies of Indian and Chinese Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism. The emphasis of this Element is analytical rather than historical. Key issues are explained in a clear, precise, accessible manner, and with a view to their contemporary relevance to ongoing philosophical debates.
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Online ISBN: 9781108558211
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication: 06 October 2022

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