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Civil-Military Relations in Southeast Asia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 September 2018

Aurel Croissant
Affiliation:
Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg, Germany

Summary

Civil-Military Relations in Southeast Asia reviews the historical origins, contemporary patterns, and emerging changes in civil–military relations in Southeast Asia from colonial times until today. It analyzes what types of military organizations emerged in the late colonial period and the impact of colonial legacies and the Japanese occupation in World War II on the formation of national armies and their role in processes of achieving independence. It analyzes the long term trajectories and recent changes of professional, revolutionary, praetorian and neo-patrimonial civil-military relations in the region. Finally, it analyzes military roles in state- and nation-building; political domination; revolutions and regime transitions; and military entrepreneurship.
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Online ISBN: 9781108654715
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication: 30 August 2018
Copyright
© Aurel Croissant 2018

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Civil-Military Relations in Southeast Asia
  • Aurel Croissant, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg, Germany
  • Online ISBN: 9781108654715
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Civil-Military Relations in Southeast Asia
  • Aurel Croissant, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg, Germany
  • Online ISBN: 9781108654715
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Civil-Military Relations in Southeast Asia
  • Aurel Croissant, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg, Germany
  • Online ISBN: 9781108654715
Available formats
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