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Series:   Elements in Ethics

Aquinas's Ethics

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 April 2020

Thomas M. Osborne Jr
Affiliation:
University of St Thomas, Houston

Summary

This Element provides an account of Thomas Aquinas's moral philosophy that emphasizes the intrinsic connection between happiness and the human good, human virtue, and the precepts of practical reason. Human beings by nature have an end to which they are directed and concerning which they do not deliberate, namely happiness. Humans achieve this end by performing good human acts, which are produced by the intellect and the will, and perfected by the relevant virtues. These virtuous acts require that the agent grasps the relevant moral principles and uses them in particular cases.
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Element
Information
Online ISBN: 9781108581325
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication: 07 May 2020
Copyright
© Thomas M. Osborne Jr 2020

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References

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