Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-n7x5d Total loading time: 0.252 Render date: 2021-12-03T12:58:50.319Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Book contents

Sudokothellophobia: Writing Hypertextually, Performatively

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 November 2007

Peter Holland
Affiliation:
University of Notre Dame, Indiana
HTML view is not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.

Summary

If you are an adventurous (or hypertextual, perhaps performative) reader I invite you to skip this introduction and go straight to the puzzle (you can always come back); what follows here is an orientation, a way into and around the main body of this article. If, as Umberto Eco writes, ‘A title must muddle the reader’s ideas, not regiment them’, then the next few pages aim to (slightly) un-muddle, though certainly not regiment, access to the puzzle through explanation of my title and method. I feel, at once, that I should apologize for this title and perhaps I would have abandoned the initial monstrosity altogether had its tripartite awkwardness not so neatly encapsulated the method. Writing about (Shakespearian) performance often involves such apologies, especially when the writing is deliberately methodological rather than descriptive of performance itself – I mean not writing about performance, but writing about writing about performance – and this is perhaps a tacit acknowledgement that writing cannot hope to reproduce a given production, neither its materiality nor ephemerality. Mike Pearson and Michael Shanks, to whom I will return, defend their discrete disciplines of theatre and archaeology with ‘Apologia’ before less apologetically and less obviously bringing them together into a fruitful interdisciplinary blend. Michael Dobson begins his reflection on ‘Writing about [Shakespearian] Performance’ most deferentially (which is not always the way he writes about Shakespearian performances): ‘I should apologize first of all for starting this chapter thus in the first person’ and then he further excuses the article, which is ‘purely personal’ and ‘very cursory and simplistic’; he also defends a title about which he feels uncomfortable. Broken down, my title reveals an attempt to create a form of writing which thickly describes Shakespearian production – in this case an adaptation of Othello I directed in 2003/4 called Othellophobia – and to weave together the most pressing textual and contextual concerns. Thus: the form of the writing is (post)structured by the number puzzle sudoku; the content is Shakespeare’s Othello – the text itself, its more recent production history and the way that my production shaped the play; and the analysis of the content, which is facilitated by the form, is represented by phobia, which signals my concern here with (sub)textual and cultural anxieties generated and sustained by the play in performance.

Type
Chapter
Information
Shakespeare Survey , pp. 154 - 169
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2007
You have Access

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×