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The Life and Times of Henry Lord Brougham
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A child prodigy, Henry Brougham (1778–1868), later Lord Brougham and Vaux, entered in 1792 the University of Edinburgh, where he focused on mathematics and then law, while his amateur scientific studies led him to become a fellow of the Royal Society at the age of twenty-five. Called to both the Scottish and English bars, and moving in radical political circles, he became famous as a defender of free speech, a passionate abolitionist, and co-founder of the Edinburgh Review. After many years as an MP, he was given a peerage in 1830 and became Lord Chancellor in Lord Grey's Whig government, where he was instrumental in the passing of the 1832 Reform Act. This three-volume autobiography was published posthumously in 1871, with additional notes. Volume 2 covers the period 1811–28, including the scandal of George IV's marriage, during which Brougham advised Queen Caroline.

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