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Interpersonal Comparisons of Well-Being
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Book description

In this volume a diverse group of economists, philosophers, political scientists, and psychologists address the problems, principles, and practices involved in comparing the well-being of different individuals. A series of questions lie at the heart of this investigation: What is the relevant concept of well-being for the purposes of comparison? How could the comparisons be carried out for policy purposes? How are such comparisons made now? How do the difficulties involved in these comparisons affect the status of utilitarian theories? This collection constitutes the most advanced and comprehensive treatment of one of the cardinal issues in social theory.

Reviews

"The issues discussed in this volume are fundamental to considerations of distributive justice and welfare economics." Contemporary Sociology

"A central message of this book is the inescapable nature of interpersonal comparisons of well being, and the centrality of fundamental philosophical values to these comparisons. It is not a criticism to say that it leaves the reader with more questions than it answers, because the issues it addresses are fundamental and complex....Economists of all types will find this an important book--stimulating, yet also somewhat disquieting." Lars Osberg, Journal of Economics Literature

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