Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-dc8c957cd-vl9xn Total loading time: 0.288 Render date: 2022-01-26T15:47:51.316Z Has data issue: false Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

8 - The Past, the Present and the Future

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2012

Tasman Brown
Affiliation:
University of Adelaide
Grant C. Townsend
Affiliation:
University of Adelaide
Sandra K. Pinkerton
Affiliation:
University of Adelaide
James R. Rogers
Affiliation:
University of Adelaide
Get access

Summary

The end of field trips to Yuendumu and the post-1970 years

The early stages of the Yuendumu Growth Study received research funding from The University of Adelaide. From April 1964, the project received substantial support for a further seven years until March 1971 from a Public Health Service Grant of the United States Department of Health, Education and Welfare. The National Institute of Dental Research, Bethesda, Maryland, approved this grant.

Towards the end of the 1960s it was becoming apparent to Barrett and Brown that a decision was needed about whether to continue the yearly visits to Yuendumu after the grant expired or to stop and concentrate more on data analysis. Time was always a precious commodity, and so much of it was required to make the field trips worthwhile. The extensive organisation needed to plan the trips and the costs involved made it increasingly difficult to justify further visits to Yuendumu after the 1971 expedition. They reached the decision to stop the field trips after considering several factors. First and foremost was the vast accumulation of field records awaiting further analysis: 1,717 sets of dental casts representing 446 participants, 1169 sets of radiographs representing 288 individuals, as well as somatometric observations, family histories, photographs, and film and sound recordings.

Table 8.1 indicates the “longitudinality” of the records obtained between 1961 and 1971. For example, the third row shows that 31 children were 6 years of age at first examination.

Type
Chapter
Information
Yuendumu
Legacy of a Longitudinal Growth Study in Central Australia
, pp. 207 - 248
Publisher: The University of Adelaide Press
Print publication year: 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×