Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-59b7f5684b-vh8gq Total loading time: 0.325 Render date: 2022-09-28T13:21:33.732Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true
This chapter is part of a book that is no longer available to purchase from Cambridge Core

Remains and Removals: The Cuala Press Revival, 1969–1989

Thomas Dillon Redshaw
Affiliation:
University of St. Thomas, St. Paul, Minnesota
Get access

Summary

Four years after the “revival” of the Cuala press in September, 1969, Liam Miller (1924–1987) published his short history The Dun Emer Press, Later the Cuala Press (1973) as the seventh installment of The New Yeats Papers from his own Dolmen Press. Reissued several times, Miller's history marked the seventieth anniversary of the founding of the Dun Emer Press, four years after the revival of the press in September, 1969. Miller's “chronicle” constitutes an hommage to the passing era of craft printing, to the ideals of the Arts and Crafts movement and the Celtic Revival, and to the conspicuous industry of the Yeats family—not only William Butler Yeats himself, but also his sisters and Mrs. Yeats (DEP 11). In his introduction to Miller's chronicle, Yeats's son Michael concludes that “The ‘new’ Cuala Press has aimed to preserve the policies and traditions that date back to the beginning of the century” (DEP 9). He underscores his mother's role in preserving those traditions. Miller's chronicle poses the Cuala revival as the third of the press's distinct periods of operation. A further three distinct periods of editorial direction may be distinguished, as Joan Hardwick's The Yeats Sisters details: the first period (1908–1925) when William Butler Yeats's editorial influence was strongest; the second period (1925–1940), when Elizabeth Yeats had achieved more autonomy; and the third period (1940–1946), when Mrs. Yeats saw new authors into print. Famous titles by Yeats, of course, appear in each period; but each period presents notable titles by others, especially so after 1940. Likewise, the Cuala revival (1969–1989) may be divided into three periods of production featuring works of Yeats gleaned from his papers and starting early in the 1970s with new work by Thomas Kinsella and John Montague. Until his death, Liam Miller exerted an editorial influence on Cuala that reiterated his academic devotion to Yeats as well his literary affection for his Dolmen poets.

In the months after the death of W. B. Yeats in France on January 28, 1939, Mrs. Yeats left “Riversdale,” in Rathfarnham, and moved to the Edwardian suburb of Rathmines, nearer to central Dublin. She leased a large house at 46 Palmerston Road and moved there on July 26, 1939.

Type
Chapter
Information
Writing Modern Ireland , pp. 151 - 173
Publisher: Liverpool University Press
Print publication year: 2015

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×