Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-59b7f5684b-s82fj Total loading time: 0.287 Render date: 2022-09-26T01:24:13.453Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true
This chapter is part of a book that is no longer available to purchase from Cambridge Core

“Notes Chirruping Answer”: Language as Music in James Joyce and Virginia Woolf

Wayne K. Chapman
Affiliation:
Clemson University
Get access

Summary

Ulysses was serialized by episode in The Egoist and The Little Review from March 1918 to December 1920. Significantly, Virginia Woolf launched a number of short experimental efforts of her own while reading these episodes, with delight and some exasperation, as they appeared. She is famous, too, for noting well in a TLS article of April 1919, revised as “Modern Fiction” in The Common Reader (first series of 1925), how James Joyce had departed from contemporary narratives by Arnold Bennett, John Galsworthy, and H. G. Wells. Joyce showed how to look at life in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man was to look at the mind, and most notably she held that this was true in the “Hades” episode of Ulysses. Woolf made reading notes on the early episodes (“Hades” was number 6), as one reads Brenda Silver's brief descriptions of those notes (155–57), wherein Woolf went only as far as commenting on the first seven episodes of Ulysses (from “Telemachus” through “Aeolus”) as they appeared in the Little Review from March to October of 1918. In viewing the notes themselves, one finds that they often reflect the remarks that Woolf published in her TLS article. The notes are inscribed in Reading Notebook XXXI, labeled by Woolf “Modern Novels (Joyce),” Holograph M91 in the Berg Collection of English and American Literature at the New York Public Library, and digital facsimiles are now available for viewing in Major Authors on CD-ROM: Virginia Woolf.

Because of this hard evidence, we may conclude that Woolf read carefully to that precise point in Ulysses for her essay. With this textual “fragment” before her, she “hazarded rather than affirmed” a “theory…as to Mr. Joyce's intention,” finding him “spiritual” (as opposed to the “materialists” just cited); as a writer, he was one

to reveal the flickerings of that innermost flame that flashes its messages through the brain,…disregard[ing]…whatever seems to him adventitious, whether it be probability, or coherence, or any other of the signposts which for generations have served to support the imagination of a reader when called upon to imagine what he can neither touch nor see.

(CR1 151)
Type
Chapter
Information
Writing Modern Ireland , pp. 229 - 236
Publisher: Liverpool University Press
Print publication year: 2015

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×