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Introduction

Women as Constitution-Makers: The Promises and the Challenges of Participation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 March 2019

Ruth Rubio-Marín
Affiliation:
Universidad de Sevilla
Helen Irving
Affiliation:
University of Sydney
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Summary

The Introduction surveys the historical development of women’s participation in constitution-making and the evolution of the right to participate and the paradigm of participatory constitutionalism. Drawing from numerous country examples, it discusses women’s formal and informal participation in constitution-making, and identifies women’s questions about, and obstacles to, such participation, as well as their affirmation of its value. It explores theories of gender, and discusses different gendered perspectives on constitutionalism, and it identifies common themes for constitutional provisions in which women’s aspirations find constitutional expression. It considers two examples of comprehensive feminist ‘constitutions’. It concludes with a note on the importance for the prospects of democratic constitutionalism of an understanding of the events, processes, values, aspirations and obstacles experienced by women in actual constitution-making that is offered in the case studies in this collection.
Type
Chapter
Information
Women as Constitution-Makers
Case Studies from the New Democratic Era
, pp. 1 - 30
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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