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References

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 November 2020

Emily A. Hemelrijk
Affiliation:
Universiteit van Amsterdam
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Women and Society in the Roman World
A Sourcebook of Inscriptions from the Roman West
, pp. 331 - 341
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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  • References
  • Emily A. Hemelrijk, Universiteit van Amsterdam
  • Book: Women and Society in the Roman World
  • Online publication: 06 November 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316536087.011
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  • References
  • Emily A. Hemelrijk, Universiteit van Amsterdam
  • Book: Women and Society in the Roman World
  • Online publication: 06 November 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316536087.011
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  • References
  • Emily A. Hemelrijk, Universiteit van Amsterdam
  • Book: Women and Society in the Roman World
  • Online publication: 06 November 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316536087.011
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