Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-6b989bf9dc-pkhfk Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-04-14T21:04:42.003Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

III - Health, Conduct, and Knowledge

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 July 2023

Corinne Saunders
Affiliation:
Durham University
Diane Watt
Affiliation:
University of Surrey
Get access

Summary

Image of the first page of this content. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.'
Type
Chapter
Information
Women and Medieval Literary Culture
From the Early Middle Ages to the Fifteenth Century
, pp. 139 - 226
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2023

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Further Reading

Blumenfeld-Kosinski, Renate (1990). Not of Woman Born: Representations of Caesarean Birth in Medieval and Renaissance Culture, Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
Fissell, Mary E. (2008). Introduction: Women, Health, and Healing in Early Modern Europe. Bulletin of the History of Medicine, Special Issue: Women, Health, and Healing in Early Modern Europe, 81.2, 117.Google Scholar
Green, Monica H. (2005). Gynaecology and Midwifery. In Medieval Science, Technology and Medicine: An Encyclopedia, ed. Glick, Thomas F., Livesey, Steven J., and Wallis., Faith New York: Routledge, 214–16.Google Scholar
Green, Monica H. (2005). Bodies, Gender, Health, Disease: Recent Work on Medieval Women’s Medicine. Studies in Medieval and Renaissance History, 3rd series 2, 146.Google Scholar
Green, Monica H. (2020). ‘Who/What Is “Trotula”?’, at: www.academia.edu/41537366/WHO_WHAT_IS_TROTULA_2020.Google Scholar
McCracken, Peggy (2003). The Curse of Eve, the Wound of the Hero: Blood, Gender and Medieval Literature, Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.Google Scholar
Rawcliffe, Carole (1995). Medicine and Society in Later Medieval England, Stroud: Alan Sutton.Google Scholar
Ritchey, Sara, and Strocchia, Sharon, eds. (2020). Gender, Health, and Healing, 1250–1550, Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press.Google Scholar
Robertson, Elizabeth (1993). Medieval Medical Views of Women and Female Spirituality in the Ancrene Wisse and Julian of Norwich’s Showings. In Feminist Approaches to the Body in Medieval Literature, ed. Lomperis, Linda and Stanbury, Sarah. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 142–67.Google Scholar

Further Reading

Amsler, Mark (2012). Affective Literacies: Writing and Multilingualism in the Later Middle Ages, Turnhout: Brepols.Google Scholar
Armstrong, Nancy, and Tennenhouse, Leonard, eds. (1987). The Ideology of Conduct: Essays on Literature and the History of Sexuality, New York: Methuen.Google Scholar
Ashley, Kathleen, and Clark, Robert L. A., eds. (2001). Medieval Conduct, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.Google Scholar
Burger, Glenn D. (2018). Conduct Becoming: Good Wives and Husbands in the Later Middle Ages, Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.Google Scholar
Ferster, Judith (1996). Fictions of Advice: The Literature and Politics of Counsel in Late Medieval England, Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.Google Scholar
Green, Karen, and Mews, Constant J., eds. (2011). Virtue Ethics for Medieval Women, 1250–1500, Heidelberg: Springer.Google Scholar
Hentsch, Alice (1975). De la littérature didactique s’adressant spécialement aux femmes, Cahors, 1903; repr. Geneva: Slatkine.Google Scholar
Johnston, Mark D., ed. (2009). Medieval Conduct Literature: An Anthology of Vernacular Guides to Behaviour for Youths, with English Translations, Toronto: University of Toronto Press.Google Scholar
Lipton, Emma (2007). Affections of the Mind: The Politics of Sacramental Marriage in Late Medieval English Literature, Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame Press.Google Scholar
Sponsler, Claire (1997). Drama and Resistance: Bodies, Goods, and Theatricality in Late Medieval England, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.Google Scholar

Further Reading

Barratt, Alexandra, ed. (2001). The Knowing of Woman’s Kind in Childing: A Middle English Version of Material Derived from the Trotula and Other Sources, Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts, Turnhout: Brepols.Google Scholar
Bishop, Louise M. (2007). Words, Stones, Herbs: The Healing Word in Medieval and Early Modern England, Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press.Google Scholar
Bühler, Curt F. (1964). Prayers and Charms in Certain Middle English Scrolls. Speculum 39, 270–8.Google Scholar
de Pizan, Christine (1999). The Book of Deeds of Arms and of Chivalry, ed. Willard, Charity Cannon, trans. Sumner Willard, University Park: Penn State University Press.Google Scholar
Driver, Martha (2003). When Is a Miscellany Not Miscellaneous? Making Sense of the Kalendar of Shepherds. Yearbook of English Studies 33, 199214.Google Scholar
Erler, Mary C., ed. (1993). Robert Copland, Poems, Toronto: University of Toronto Press.Google Scholar
Green, Monica H. (2001). The Trotula: A Medieval Compendium of Women’s Medicine, Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.Google Scholar
Jolly, Karen L. (1996). Popular Religion in Late Saxon England: Elf Charms in Context, Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.Google Scholar
Kieckhefer, Richard (1990). Magic in the Middle Ages, Cambridge Medieval Textbooks, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Riddle, John M. (1992). Contraception and Abortion from the Ancient World to the Renaissance, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
Saunders, Corinne (2010). Magic and the Supernatural in Medieval English Romance. Cambridge: D. S. Brewer.Google Scholar
Skemer, Don C. (2006). Binding Words: Textual Amulets in the Middle Ages. University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.Google Scholar
Sommer, H. O. (1892). The Kalender of Shepherdes, The Edition of Paris 1503 in Photographic Facsimile: A Faithful Reprint of R. Pynson’s Edition of London 1506, 3 vols. in 1, London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner.Google Scholar
Sponsler, Claire (2009). The English How the Good Wiif Taughte Hir Doughtir and How the Wise Man Taught His Sonne. In Johnston, Mark D., ed., Medieval Conduct Literature: An Anthology of Vernacular Guides to Behaviour for Youths, with English Translations. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.Google Scholar

Further Reading

Bell, David (1995). What Nuns Read: Books and Libraries in Medieval English Nunneries, Kalamazoo: Cistercian Publications.Google Scholar
Bryan, Jennifer (2008). Looking Inward: Devotional Reading and the Private Self in Late Medieval England, Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.Google Scholar
Cré, Marleen, Denissen, Diana, and Renevey, Denis, eds. (2020). Late Medieval Devotional Compilations in England, Medieval Church Series 41, Turnhout: Brepols.Google Scholar
Denissen, Diana (2019). Middle English Devotional Compilations: Composing Imaginative Variations in Late Medieval England, Religion and Culture in the Middle Ages, Cardiff: University of Wales.Google Scholar
Dutton, Elisabeth (2008). Julian of Norwich: The Influence of Late-Medieval Devotional Compilations, Woodbridge: D. S. Brewer.Google Scholar
Erler, Mary C. (2002). Women, Reading, and Piety in Late Medieval England, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Gillespie, Vincent (2011). Looking in Holy Books: Essays on Late Medieval Religious Writing in England, Turnhout: Brepols.Google Scholar
Miles, Laura Saetveit (2020). The Virgin Mary’s Book at the Annunciation, Cambridge: D. S. Brewer.Google Scholar
Minnis, Alastair (2010). Medieval Theory of Authorship: Scholastic Literary Attitudes in the Later Middle Ages, 2nd ed., Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.Google Scholar
Olsen, Linda and Kerby-Fulton, Kathryn, eds. (2005). Voices in Dialogue: Reading Women in the Middle Ages, Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame Press.Google Scholar
Parkes, Malcolm (1976). The Influence of the Concepts of Ordinatio and Compilatio on the Development of the Book. In Alexander, J. J. G. and Gibson, M. T., eds., Medieval Learning and Literature: Essays Presented to Richard William Hunt. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 115–41.Google Scholar

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×