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1 - Security basics

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 July 2010

James Kempf
Affiliation:
DoCoMo Labs USA, Palo Alto, California
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Summary

The Internet was originally developed with little or no security. As a government-run test bed for academic research, the user community was co-operative and nobody considered the possibility that one user or group of users would undertake operations harmful to others. The commercialization of the Internet in the early to mid 1990s resulted in the rise of the potential for adversarial interactions. These interactions are motivated by various harming concerns: the desire for profit at others' expense without providing any offered value, the need to prove technical prowess by disruption, etc. The introduction of widespread, inexpensive wireless links into the Internet in the late 1990s led to additional opportunities for disruption. Unlike wired links, wireless links know no physical boundaries, so physical security measures that are effective for securing the endpoints where terminals plug into wired networks are ineffective for wireless links. Some initial attempts to secure wireless links had the opposite effect: providing the appearance of security while actually exposing the end user to sophisticated attacks. Subsequently, wireless security has become an important technical topic for research, development, and standardization.

In response to the rise of security problems on the Internet, the technical community has developed a collection of basic technologies for addressing network security. While there are special characteristics of wireless systems that in certain cases distinguish wireless network security from general network security, wireless network security is a subtopic of general network security.

Type
Chapter
Information
Wireless Internet Security
Architecture and Protocols
, pp. 1 - 20
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2008

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  • Security basics
  • James Kempf
  • Book: Wireless Internet Security
  • Online publication: 06 July 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511754739.002
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  • Security basics
  • James Kempf
  • Book: Wireless Internet Security
  • Online publication: 06 July 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511754739.002
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Security basics
  • James Kempf
  • Book: Wireless Internet Security
  • Online publication: 06 July 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511754739.002
Available formats
×