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Preface

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 July 2010

James Kempf
Affiliation:
DoCoMo Labs USA, Palo Alto, California
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Summary

Wireless Internet Security: Architecture and Protocols approaches wireless Internet security from the direction of system architecture. A system architecture is essentially a high-level blueprint that guides the detailed design, implementation, and deployment decisions that result in a real, usable system, just like the architectural plans for a building guide its construction. Architectures serve as tools for understanding how to design and evolve a complex information technology system. Architectures are regularly developed by wireless standardization bodies to guide the development of interoperable, standardized protocols on interfaces between equipment provided by multiple vendors, including wireless devices used by consumers. Corporations often provide architectures as guidelines for customers, describing how their products fit together with other equipment to provide solutions for their customers' information technology problems.

In the field of wireless security, the architectural approach has been neglected. This neglect is partially a result of the case-driven nature of network security. Most security systems have been developed in response to specific attacks that surface after the system has been deployed, rather than as a planned part of the initial system development process. Indeed, the original Internet architecture had almost no provisions for security. Internet users were assumed to be members of a co-operative community that would never attempt actions on the Internet harmful to others' interests. This approach is changing slowly, as system designers begin to internalize the disastrous results of grafting security onto a system after a successful attack has compromised the original design.

Type
Chapter
Information
Wireless Internet Security
Architecture and Protocols
, pp. vii - ix
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2008

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  • Preface
  • James Kempf
  • Book: Wireless Internet Security
  • Online publication: 06 July 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511754739.001
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  • Preface
  • James Kempf
  • Book: Wireless Internet Security
  • Online publication: 06 July 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511754739.001
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Preface
  • James Kempf
  • Book: Wireless Internet Security
  • Online publication: 06 July 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511754739.001
Available formats
×