Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-56f9d74cfd-5k9ck Total loading time: 0.385 Render date: 2022-06-25T18:07:36.734Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

2 - Population growth rate and its determinants: an overview

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 May 2010

R. M. Sibly
Affiliation:
University of Reading
J. Hone
Affiliation:
University of Canberra
T. H. Clutton-Brock
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
Get access

Summary

Introduction

With the persistent increase of the human population – now exceeding six billion – all species face increased pressure on resources. Understanding the factors responsible for limiting populations or causing species' extinctions therefore has increased urgency. Recent developments in population analysis, described below, have refined our understanding of the determinants of population growth rate and linked the theory to field data, and there is increasing interest in applying methods of this kind in conservation, wildlife management and ecotoxicology. This paper emphasizes the central role of population growth rate and reviews the use of data to test relevant theory and models primarily for wildlife populations. In this section we consider the definition and importance of population growth rate and briefly examine its historical background.

Definitions and estimation of population growth rate

Population growth rate is the summary parameter of trends in population density or abundance. It tells us whether density and abundance are increasing, stable or decreasing, and how fast they are changing. Population growth rate describes the per capita rate of growth of a population, either as the factor by which population size increases per year, conventionally given the symbol λ (= Nt+1/Nt), or as r = loge λ. Generally here, population growth rate will refer to r. λ is referred to variously as ‘finite growth rate’, ‘finite rate of increase’, ‘net reproductive rate’ or ‘population multiplication rate’, r is known as ‘rate of natural increase’, ‘instantaneous growth rate’, ‘exponential rate of increase’ or ‘fitness’.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2003

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
7
Cited by

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×