Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-59b7f5684b-j4fss Total loading time: 0.338 Render date: 2022-09-24T17:54:45.062Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

5 - Conflicts and Security

from Part II - Issue Areas

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 September 2016

Andrew MacK
Affiliation:
Simon Fraser University
Amitav Acharya
Affiliation:
American University, Washington DC
Get access

Summary

The end of the Cold War transformed the global security architecture. It removed a major source of political conflict from the international system and liberated the UN from more than four decades of virtual political paralysis. Popular concerns about the threat of global nuclear war that had fueled a worldwide anti-nuclear movement largely disappeared. The ending of East–West hostilities also meant that both Cold War alliance systems – NATO and the Warsaw Pact – lost their strategic raison d’être. The Warsaw Pact ceased to exist in 1991, while NATO shrank sharply in the 1990s. NATO defense budgets decreased by 30 percent; military force levels by 28 to 40 percent, while US armed forces in Europe shrank by two-thirds between 1991 and 1997 and NATO strategic planners pondered the future of an alliance that had lost its traditional rationale, but had not yet found a new strategic role.

Absent the communist threat that had sustained the alliance for more than forty years, Western policy began increasingly to focus on what appeared to be the growing threat of violent instability in the developing world – and in the Balkans. Less than five years after the ending of East/West hostilities, Saddam Hussein had invaded and occupied Kuwait in an act of gross unprovoked aggression, the break-up of Yugoslavia had led to a savage civil war in Bosnia, the UN peacekeeping mission in Somalia had collapsed in the wake of an abortive US attempt to kill a Somali warlord, and an estimated 800,000 Tutsis and moderate Hutus had been killed in the Rwandan genocide.

In 1990, noted realist scholar, John Mearsheimer, famously argued that the world could come to miss the Cold War.

The conditions that have made for decades of peace in the West are fast disappearing, as Europe prepares to return to the multi-polar system that, between 1648 and 1945, bred one destructive conflict after another.

The end of the Cold War had a major impact on security in the developing world where the overwhelming majority of wars were now being fought.

Type
Chapter
Information
Why Govern?
Rethinking Demand and Progress in Global Governance
, pp. 95 - 120
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2016

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×