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6 - Signals and noise

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2012

Maxwell T. Boykoff
Affiliation:
University of Colorado Boulder
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Summary

Due to the unprecedented scale of influences that humans have had on the global climate and environment, Paul Crutzen famously dubbed this contemporary time the ‘Anthropocene Era’ (2002). For billions of years, radiative forcing – producing changes in the climate – has occurred in response to energy imbalances. Atmospheric temperature change is the most evident form of climate forcing (Wigley, 1999). However, an effect of the energy harnessed through carbon-based industrial development has been GHG emissions and anthropogenic climate change.

The term ‘anthropogenic’ comes from the Greek root ‘anthropos’, meaning ‘human’. Anthropogenic climate change is also often referred to as the ‘enhanced greenhouse effect’. Anthropogenic sources include fossil-fuel burning (primarily coal, gas and oil) and land-use change. Current heavy reliance on carbon-based sources for energy in industry and society has led to significant human contributions to climate change, noted in particular through increases in temperature as well as sea-level rise.

Type
Chapter
Information
Who Speaks for the Climate?
Making Sense of Media Reporting on Climate Change
, pp. 121 - 144
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2011

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  • Signals and noise
  • Maxwell T. Boykoff, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Book: Who Speaks for the Climate?
  • Online publication: 05 June 2012
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511978586.007
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To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

  • Signals and noise
  • Maxwell T. Boykoff, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Book: Who Speaks for the Climate?
  • Online publication: 05 June 2012
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511978586.007
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Signals and noise
  • Maxwell T. Boykoff, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Book: Who Speaks for the Climate?
  • Online publication: 05 June 2012
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511978586.007
Available formats
×