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Chapter 44 - Drug Use

from Section 2.8 - Neurologic, Behavioral, and Psychosocial Health

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 June 2017

David Chelmow
Affiliation:
Virginia Commonwealth University
Anita Blanchard
Affiliation:
University of Chicago
Lee Learman
Affiliation:
Florida Atlantic University
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The Well-Woman Visit , pp. 260 - 265
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2017

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References

Guidelines

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References

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