Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-56f9d74cfd-2vtd9 Total loading time: 1.288 Render date: 2022-06-25T21:31:37.933Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

Section 2.7 - Cancer Screening and Prevention

from Section 2 - Components of the Well-Woman Visit

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 June 2017

David Chelmow
Affiliation:
Virginia Commonwealth University
Anita Blanchard
Affiliation:
University of Chicago
Lee Learman
Affiliation:
Florida Atlantic University
Get access

Summary

Image of the first page of this content. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.'
Type
Chapter
Information
The Well-Woman Visit , pp. 204 - 238
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2017

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Primary Sources

Saslow, D., Solomon, D., Lawson, H.W. et al. American Cancer Society, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, and American Society for Clinical Pathology screening guidelines for the prevention and early detection of cervical cancer. CA Cancer J Clin. 2012, 62:147–72. Available at: www.asccp.org/Guidelines/Screening-Guidelines. Retrieved December 30, 2016.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Cervical cancer screening and prevention. Practice Bulletin No. 168. Obstet Gynecol. 2016, 128:e111–30. Available at: www.acog.org/Resources-And-Publications/Practice-Bulletins-List. Retrieved December 30, 2016.PubMed
Moyer, V.A. Screening for cervical cancer: US Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement. U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Ann Intern Med. 2012, 156:880–91. Available at: www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/uspstf/uspscerv.htm. Retrieved December 30, 2016.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Secondary Sources

Panel on Opportunistic Infections in HIV-Infected Adults and Adolescents. Human Papillomavirus Disease in: Guidelines for the prevention and treatment of opportunistic infections in HIV-infected adults and adolescents: Recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Institutes of Health, and the HIV Medicine Association of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. Available at: https://aidsinfo.nih.gov/guidelines/html/4/adult-and-adolescent-oi-prevention-and-treatment-guidelines/343/hpv Retrieved December 30, 2016.
Massad, L.S., Einstein, M.H., Huh, W.K. et al. 2012 Updated consensus guidelines for the management of abnormal cervical cancer screening tests and cancer precursors. Obstet Gynecol. 2013, 121:829–46 and J Lower Gen Tract Dis. 2013, 17:S127.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Huh, W.K., Ault, K., Chelmow, D. et al. Use of primary high risk human papillomavirus testing for cervical cancer screening: Interim clinical guidance. J Lower Genital Tract Dis Obstet Gynecol. 2015, 125:330–7, and Gynecol Oncol. 2015, 136:178–82. Available at: www.sgo.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/HPV-Guidance-Doc-Article_main.pdf. Retrieved December 30, 2016.Google ScholarPubMed
Conry, J.A. and Brown, H. Well-Woman Task Force: Components of the Well-Woman Visit. Obstet Gynecol. 2015, 126(4):697701.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Levin, B., Lieberman, D., McFarland, B. et al. Screening and surveillance for the early detection of colorectal cancer and adenomatous polyps, 2008: A Joint Guideline from the American Cancer Society, the US Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer, and the American College of Radiology. Gastroenterology. 2008, 134:1570–95 and CA Cancer J Clin. 2008, 58:130–60.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Colorectal cancer screening strategies. Committee Opinion #609. Obstet Gynecol. 2014, 124(4):849–55.
Screening for colorectal cancer: US Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement. US Preventive Services Task Force. JAMA2016;315-2564-2575. Available at: http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/Page/Document/UPdateSummaryFinal/colorectal-cancer-screening2?ds=1&s=colorectal cancer screening referenced 6/25/16.
Moyer, V.A. Screening for ovarian cancer. US Preventive Services Task Force Reaffirmation recommendation statement. US Preventive Services Task Force. Ann Intern Med. 2012, 157:900–4. Available at: www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/Page/Document/RecommendationStatementFinal/ovarian-cancer-screening. Retrieved February 11, 2016.Google Scholar
American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. The role of the obstetrician-gynecologist in the early detection of epithelial ovarian cancer. Committee Opinion No. 477. Obstet Gynecol. 2011, 117:742–6.PubMed
American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Salpingectomy for ovarian cancer prevention. Committee Opinion No. 620. Obstet Gynecol. 2015, 125:279–81.PubMed
Lancaster, J.M., Powell, C.B., Chen, L.M., and Richardson, D.L. Society of Gynecologic Oncology statement on risk assessment for inherited gynecologic cancer predispositions. Gynecol Oncol. 2015, 136(1):37.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Hereditary cancer syndromes and risk assessment. Committee Opinion No. 634. Obstet Gynecol. 2015, 125:1538–43.PubMed
National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Genetic/familial high-risk assessment: breast and ovarian. Available at: www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/pdf/genetics_screening.pdf. Retrieved January 25, 2016.

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×