Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-77c89778f8-7drxs Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-07-22T17:32:42.907Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

10 - Towards Participatory Irrigation Management for Canals

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 July 2022

Kamta Prasad
Affiliation:
Chairman, Institute for Resource Management and Economic Development, Delhi and Former professor, Economics and rural development, Indian Institute of Public Administration, Delhi
Get access

Summary

The chapter provides a critical review of participatory irrigation management (PIM) in canal irrigation, which is regarded as an internationally acclaimed institutional set up for a more efficient irrigation system. It also examines the case for PIM, provides background information of its introduction in India along with the support measures offered by the government, explains the salient features of the laws enacted for this purpose, draws attention to its slow progress along with reasons for the same, throws light on some key aspects of PIM experience in India, including socio-economic impact, highlights conditions for its success and indicates some macro-implications.

Case of PIM

The vast canal network in India has traditionally been administered by the State Irrigation Departments, which directly deal with individual farmers. This puts tremendous pressure on the Departments in preparing the water distribution schedule for individual farmers. Faced with unpredictable water flows, supplies tend to be made arbitrarily or in a haphazard manner. Because of this, objectives of optimum utilization of the created irrigation potential, equitable distribution of water at the farm level and maximum increase in farm productivity are not achieved on a sustainable basis. There is neither any practical effort on the part of farmers to maintain field channels constructed by the government, nor the sense of economic use of water generated among them. Moreover, larger benefits are often derived by those having privileged position in the community or having their land located in an outlet command or in head reaches of a canal system at the cost of socially or economically weaker sections and tail-enders.

Hence, policy makers and thinkers started realizing that the complex tasks involved in water management could not be performed efficiently by a centralized bureaucracy and that it would be better to transfer much of the power and responsibilities to the actual users of water. It was hoped that farmers’ involvement would reduce water distribution cost and ensure proper maintenance of irrigation system at the micro-level. The understanding that they own the system would motivate farmers towards better use of water. They would pay irrigation charges at the main outlet level on volumetric basis which would be less than crop-wise irrigation charges on acreage basis.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Foundation Books
Print publication year: 2014

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

  • Towards Participatory Irrigation Management for Canals
  • Kamta Prasad, Chairman, Institute for Resource Management and Economic Development, Delhi and Former professor, Economics and rural development, Indian Institute of Public Administration, Delhi
  • Book: Water in the Coming Decades: Policy and Governance Issues in India
  • Online publication: 13 July 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9789385386077.011
Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

  • Towards Participatory Irrigation Management for Canals
  • Kamta Prasad, Chairman, Institute for Resource Management and Economic Development, Delhi and Former professor, Economics and rural development, Indian Institute of Public Administration, Delhi
  • Book: Water in the Coming Decades: Policy and Governance Issues in India
  • Online publication: 13 July 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9789385386077.011
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Towards Participatory Irrigation Management for Canals
  • Kamta Prasad, Chairman, Institute for Resource Management and Economic Development, Delhi and Former professor, Economics and rural development, Indian Institute of Public Administration, Delhi
  • Book: Water in the Coming Decades: Policy and Governance Issues in India
  • Online publication: 13 July 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9789385386077.011
Available formats
×