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Starbursts and Compact Supernova Remnants

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 November 2010

G. Tenorio-Tagle
Affiliation:
Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Tenerife
J. Franco
Affiliation:
Instituto de Astronomía UNAM, Apartado Postal 70-264, 04510 México D.F., México
S. J. Arthur
Affiliation:
Instituto de Astronomía UNAM, Apartado Postal 70-264, 04510 México D.F., México
W. Miller
Affiliation:
Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin – Madison, 475 N. Charter St., Madison, WI 53706, USA
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Summary

In this paper we discuss the differences between normal supernova remnants (SNRs) evolving in comparatively low-density ambient media (n0 ≪ 105 cm−3) and “compact” supernova remnants that evolve in the high-density (n0 > 104 cm−3) environment that one would expect to find in starburst regions of galaxies. For normal SNRs, radiative losses do not start to become important until time scales of the order of 104 yr, after the onset of thin shell formation. For compact SNRs, however, the evolution proceeds at a much quicker pace, with radiative losses due to free-free emission, given the high temperatures (≥ 107 K), being important because of the high densities. The onset of thin shell formation in this case occurs over time scales of the order of years, and most of the radiation is emitted in X-rays and the UV. We argue that the compact supernova activity associated with starburst regions in the centers of galaxies gives rise to most of the typical properties of the Broad Line Regions of active galactic nuclei.

Introduction

Starbursts are usually traced by their bright photoionized regions and large cluster luminosities, in either optical or IR wavelengths. The mass spectrum of the resulting stellar groups is difficult to derive but a large fraction of massive stars is usually implied. Stars with initial masses above ∼ 8 M have strong UV radiation fields and significant mass loss during their whole evolution, and they are also the progenitors of Type II and Ib supernovae (SNe).

Type
Chapter
Information
Violent Star Formation
From 30 Doradus to QSOs
, pp. 387 - 395
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1994

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  • Starbursts and Compact Supernova Remnants
    • By J. Franco, Instituto de Astronomía UNAM, Apartado Postal 70-264, 04510 México D.F., México, S. J. Arthur, Instituto de Astronomía UNAM, Apartado Postal 70-264, 04510 México D.F., México, W. Miller, Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin – Madison, 475 N. Charter St., Madison, WI 53706, USA
  • G. Tenorio-Tagle, Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Tenerife
  • Book: Violent Star Formation
  • Online publication: 10 November 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511600159.068
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  • Starbursts and Compact Supernova Remnants
    • By J. Franco, Instituto de Astronomía UNAM, Apartado Postal 70-264, 04510 México D.F., México, S. J. Arthur, Instituto de Astronomía UNAM, Apartado Postal 70-264, 04510 México D.F., México, W. Miller, Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin – Madison, 475 N. Charter St., Madison, WI 53706, USA
  • G. Tenorio-Tagle, Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Tenerife
  • Book: Violent Star Formation
  • Online publication: 10 November 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511600159.068
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Starbursts and Compact Supernova Remnants
    • By J. Franco, Instituto de Astronomía UNAM, Apartado Postal 70-264, 04510 México D.F., México, S. J. Arthur, Instituto de Astronomía UNAM, Apartado Postal 70-264, 04510 México D.F., México, W. Miller, Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin – Madison, 475 N. Charter St., Madison, WI 53706, USA
  • G. Tenorio-Tagle, Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Tenerife
  • Book: Violent Star Formation
  • Online publication: 10 November 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511600159.068
Available formats
×