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Selected Bibliography

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 October 2020

Charles LaPorte
Affiliation:
University of Washington
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The Victorian Cult of Shakespeare
Bardology in the Nineteenth Century
, pp. 196 - 208
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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  • Selected Bibliography
  • Charles LaPorte, University of Washington
  • Book: The Victorian Cult of Shakespeare
  • Online publication: 30 October 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108866262.009
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  • Selected Bibliography
  • Charles LaPorte, University of Washington
  • Book: The Victorian Cult of Shakespeare
  • Online publication: 30 October 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108866262.009
Available formats
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  • Selected Bibliography
  • Charles LaPorte, University of Washington
  • Book: The Victorian Cult of Shakespeare
  • Online publication: 30 October 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108866262.009
Available formats
×