Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-md8df Total loading time: 0.218 Render date: 2021-12-09T14:02:18.880Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

5 - Information dissemination

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 December 2014

Christoph Sommer
Affiliation:
Universität Paderborn, Germany
Falko Dressler
Affiliation:
Universität Paderborn, Germany
Get access

Summary

The objective of this chapter is to discuss data dissemination in vehicular networks in detail. We concentrate essentially on network-layer and application-layer protocols, which are often discussed and developed as a single protocol above the respective access technologies. The key objective is to achieve information exchange between any two vehicles, from one vehicle to all neighboring ones, from one vehicle to infrastructure components, from infrastructure to one or all neighboring vehicles, and dissemination from a vehicle to all those that are interested in the content.

We start by looking at ad-hoc routing protocols that were suggested in the early days of vehicular networks. Having identified their limitations, we explore alternatives, starting with geographic routing and geocast as communication primitives, and then exploring one of the most promising domains in the scope of vehicular networks: beaconing or one-hop broadcasting. In this framework, this chapter details the basic principles underlying such inter-vehicle communication (IVC) approaches, namely unicast, local broadcast, anycast, and multicast communication principles as used in vehicular networks. We of course investigate the current state of the standardization efforts, primarily focusing on the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) standardization towards cooperative awareness messages (CAMs) and decentralized environmental notification messages (DENMs) as well as the ETSI GeoNetworking initiative. Furthermore, we explore options for exploiting available infrastructure such as roadside units (RSUs) or even parked vehicles to provide access to some backbone network or to help spread information among the vehicles. We conclude this chapter with a discussion of delay/disruption-tolerant network (DTN) approaches and the use of concepts known from Internet-based peer-to-peer networks.

This chapter is organized as follows.

  1. • Ad-hoc routing (Section 5.1) – We start by exploring classical mobile ad-hoc network (MANET) routing algorithms in detail, because some basic knowledge of ad-hoc routing is needed in order to understand the more sophisticated vehicular ad-hoc network (VANET) routing options. In this section, we also discuss the applicability of MANET routing to VANETs as well as the specific challenges resulting from the underlying mobility pattern and delay constraints for vehicular safety applications.

  2. […]

Type
Chapter
Information
Vehicular Networking , pp. 136 - 228
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2014

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×