Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-fg2fv Total loading time: 0.282 Render date: 2021-10-22T03:37:58.933Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

17 - Reasons and prevention of embolization failure

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 November 2010

Bruce McLucas
Affiliation:
UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA
Togas Tulandi
Affiliation:
McGill University, Montréal
Get access

Summary

This chapter will examine the failures of uterine artery embolization (UAE) in our center. The overall results of UAE and our standard to define failures have been discussed in Chapter 14. In short, these standards are minimal or no shrinkage, no relief of symptoms, and hysterectomy. Here, we will also discuss technical failures and failures to achieve fertility.

Excluded patients

In our practice, we perform endoscopic evaluations of the uterus, as well as taking into account the possible contraindication or factors that may lead to failure. We exclude patients prior to embolization using the scheme outlined in the Chapter 14. Prevention of failure starts with selecting the correct procedure. We have excluded six patients with gynecologic malignancy. Twelve patients who presented with acute uterine hemorrhage and were embolized prior to endoscopic evaluation on an emergency basis were evaluated with endoscopy after embolization. One of these patients was discovered to have a malignancy and was referred for a definitive therapy. We also excluded 22 patients with atypical endometrial hyperplasia and eight patients with acute pelvic infection.

Definition of failure

Minimal shrinkage

Shrinkage alone is not a sole criterion of success. Later in this chapter, we will analyze patients who presented with uterine shrinkage of 50%, but they could not be categorized into the success group.

Type
Chapter
Information
Uterine Fibroids
Embolization and other Treatments
, pp. 125 - 132
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2003

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×