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Conclusions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 July 2009

Patricia Noller
Affiliation:
Professor of Psychology, University of Queensland
Judith A. Feeney
Affiliation:
Senior Lecturer in Psychology, University of Queensland
Patricia Noller
Affiliation:
University of Queensland
Judith A. Feeney
Affiliation:
University of Queensland
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Summary

Like fingerprints, all marriages are different.

—G. B. Shaw

The study of marriage has advanced significantly over the last two decades, with new theories and methodologies coming to the fore. In this book, we have assembled some of the most innovative and creative work in this area, and the studies represent a broad sample of the latest research. The contributions shed new light on the characteristics of couples' day-to-day interactions, together with their attempts to negotiate major problems and transitions.

THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVES

The studies of marriage presented in this book come from a range of theoretical perspectives. This theoretical underpinning is a major strength, allowing researchers and clinicians to develop and test specific predictions about the nature of interaction processes and their effects on marital outcomes.

Attachment Theory

Attachment theory provides a guiding framework for the research by Simpson and his colleagues, and is also discussed in a number of other chapters. This theory highlights the importance of the bond between marital partners and the implications of earlier relationship experiences for the success of their couple relationships. This focus on intimate relationships as attachment relationships comes from the work of Hazan and Shaver (1987), who explored the relevance of attachment history and attachment security to adult romantic love. According to this perspective, attachment behavior is a normal part of romantic involvements, and these relationships play a central role in meeting partners' needs for comfort and security.

Type
Chapter
Information
Understanding Marriage
Developments in the Study of Couple Interaction
, pp. 519 - 534
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2002

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References

Hazan, C., & Shaver, P. R. (1987). Romantic love conceptualized as an attachment process. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 52, 511–524CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

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